It is currently Wed Nov 20, 2019 12:51 pm

All times are UTC - 5 hours [ DST ]




 Page 1 of 2 [ 13 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next
Author Message
 Post subject: Elvis at Humes High School - updated!
PostPosted: Mon Jan 28, 2013 9:34 am 
Flame
User avatar

Joined: Tue Nov 16, 2010 10:40 am
Posts: 383
For Elvis were the Humes years the innocent years, the pure years, the years of learning, of growing to become a young man. The roots of Elvis, the man, grow deeply in those North Memphis neighbor hoods and on the campus and in the classrooms of Humes High School.
Elvis attended Humes High School from his 8th grade year in 1948 until his Graduation.

This report may give a small glimpse of Elvis’ battles against hunger and poverty, of his dreams of one day becoming a star.

There exist many Elvis Myths like, for example:

-Elvis was a Mama’s boy. He didn’t do anything without her approval
-Elvis was a sissy at Humes. He needed protection from the bullies who
always wanted to beat him up because of his sideburns and loud clothes.

-Elvis was thrown off the Humes football team because of his long hair
-Elvis’ first appearance on stage (other than the Mississippi Alabama State Fair
and Dairy show on October 3, 1945) was at the Humes High variety show his
senior year.

All this and many more myths that were repeated so often, that they became woven into the Elvis legend as “facts”. Not so. Let’s see what his closest friends, his teachers and classmates have to say about him.

Image
Humes High School

Elvis was a Mama’s boy…..

Evan “Buzzy” Forbes: I’ve heard a lot about how protective Mrs. Presley was of Elvis, that he didn’t go anywhere without or doing anything unless she gave her approval. That’s just not true. We would go out at night like any normal kids. I can’t say that Elvis’ mother never followed him to school in her life time, but I never saw her go to school with him. Hell, Paul, Farley, Elvis and I were going to school all the time. Heck, we walked through the Courts together and walked across the bayou to and from school.


Elvis was a sissi at Humes…...

Evan “Buzzy” Forbes: Another myth surrounding Elvis life during his days at Humes is that Bobby (Red) West protected Elvis from guys who wanted to beat up on him because of his clothes or the sideburns. Elvis never needed protection. He could give it and take it with the best of us! He didn’t ever go out looking for trouble, but I never saw Elvis lose a fight.
Once, when I was playing freshman football in the ninth grade at Humes, Elvis came to see our game with Treadwell. After the game we were walking past the Treadwell team bus to our bus. One of the Treadwell players stuck his head out of the bus and cursed our coach, Lee Thompson. Elvis grabbed this guy and cold-cocked him, knocking him all the way back into the bus. None of his player’s team mates came out to challenge him either.

Farley Guy : You hear a lot of talk from a lot of people about their being Elvis’ best friends at Humes. There were just four of us – Elvis, Buzzy, Paul and me. Later, after Elvis began recording, a lot of old Humes people attached themselves to him. Just before Elvis started singing, that’s when Red West came along. I have read so much about guys at school picking on Elvis all the time because of his sideburns and loud clothes, but I don’t remember any of these fights. Elvis was a scrapper. No one had to take up for him. Elvis stood his own ground. He was no killer but he had courage and he was quick, I don’t remember there being any gang of bullies at Humes. The only bully I remember there was Red West.
I never cared for Red West in those days. He was a smart-mouth, a bully. One day we got into it and I wrapped a footstool around his head.

It never entered anyone’s head in Lauderdale Courts that one day Elvis Presley would become the biggest Rock ‘n’ Roll star of all time. But regardless of how big Elvis was to become, how important he was – he was always still just Elvis, the guy I knew in Lauderdale Courts. That’s just the kind of guy he always was.

Doris Guy-Wallace (sister of Farley Guy): One day Red West and Bobby Dawson were picking on Elvis in a woodshop class at Humes and Farley came to Elvis’ side. Next thing you know, they were fighting. Farley told me about it at home that afternoon and the next day me, a tomboy and not quite five feet tall, I was all over Red at school. I let him know I didn’t like what had happened.
The kids at Humes pretty much looked down on Elvis like he was white trash. He couldn’t afford good clothes and he couldn’t afford to keep his hair looking good. He went around with his hair all slicked down.
When he was going to Humes, very few had anything to do with him; yet after he had that first hit record and started becoming famous a lot of them started hanging on him. They were nothing but leeches. About the only friends he had at Humes were my brother, Buzzy Forbes and Paul Dougher and then his cousins, Gene and Junior Smith.

Elvis became famous, he realized his dreams but he paid a price for it. I thought when he died, he would finally have peace, but all the things that have come out since then, I guess he will never have peace.

Image
Elvis and his friends at Lauderdale Courts: Farley Guy, Elvis, Paul Dougher and “Buzzy” Forbes

All fans know that Elvis Presley was a tough boxer? All you have to do is remember his role in “Kid Galahad” and the many rough and tumble fight scenes in most of his movies. Elvis may have been a brawler in reel life, but in real life he was in his own words “a lover, not a fighter”. At least during his Humes years – so say Walt Doxey, who coached Elvis ever so briefly on the Humes High School boxing team.

Walt Doxey: I put him in the ring against Sambo Barrom and this guy bloodied Elvis’ nose pretty good. Then Elvis came to me and said “Coach, I hate to tell you this, but I’m quitting the team. I’m a lover… not a fighter”.
May Elvis have tried out for the boxing team because he might liked to try anything new. But after a couple of rounds with Sambo, he crawled out of the ring and told me “There’s more to this than I thought here was”. And he left me and never came back to the team. However, if there are those fans who may think less of Elvis for quitting the ring, we might explain that Barrom was the national Golden Gloves champion and later became the most successful professional boxer to come out of Elvis. He was older than Elvis. He had boxed for Humes and he was over there at the time helping me get our team ready for the city high school tournament. When Elvis came out for the team, I put him in there with Sambo to see what he could do. He was a great kid!



Elvis was thrown of the Humes football team……..

Malcolm Phillips (assistant football coach): During his time at Humes Elvis was just a kid. He was very shy but nice. He signed up for the football team. I would always tell the boys to keep helmets on. But there would always be one not wearing his helmet. He had his hair all slicked down. It was Elvis.
I think Elvis lasted about a week or two and then he quit the team, so he could get a job after school. I know he talked with Coach Boyce first before quitting the team. The idea for Elvis to leave the team was his own. He was not forced to leave.

Image
Coaches Malcolm Phillips and Rube Boyce

Coach Rube Boyce: Elvis came out for the football team. I guess he lasted a week, maybe two. Elvis had a good speed and he was quick. At the end of one of our practices I called three or four boys aside and told them they needed a haircut. Elvis was one of them. _The next morning Elvis arrived early to school, He came to me and said, “Coach, I didn’t get my hair cut, but is it alright if I practice today? I think I’ve got a job”. So I let him practice. Then he came to my office again and told me he was quitting the team because he had to get a job, so he could afford to buy his lunch at school (lunch at Humes then cost 15 cent). After that every once in a while I would give him a quarter, so he could buy his lunch at school.
Elvis was a good boy, but I don’t think many of the students or teacher at Humes knew him all that well. He was one of the most polite boys I ever knew.

Image
At a dinner after school

Elvis first appearance at Humes….

Evan “Buzzy” Forbes:I’ve read a lot of books that say the first time Elvis performed on stage, other than at the Mississippi-Alabama Fair and Dairy Show in 1945, where Elvis sang “Old Shep” and won fifth place
was during his senior year at Humes when he was in a variety show. That’s just not so. ‘The first time Elvis appeared on stage in Memphis was during the fall of his junior year at Humes. Every month he would go somewhere to entertain someone. Sometimes it would be at the old Kennedy Veterans Hospital out on Getwell to entertain the veterans or the wounded coming home from the Korea War. There we would just mingle with the guys, talk and maybe shoot pool with them. Anything to take their minds off their problems. And sometimes we went to the home for Incurables over the Glenview area. They used to have live radio shows with live singers there. A West Memphis radio station set the whole thing up. Well, one night over at the Home for Incurables, Elvis got up on the stage and he picked his own guitar. The rest of us bopped while he was picking. The patients loved it. Elvis was playing his own version of Kay Star’s “Harbor Lights”. It’s a slow song, you know, but Elvis was putting his own little touches to it. He couldn’t fast dance in those days, but he could slow dance.

Image
Kennedy Veterans Hospital

Doris Guy-Wallace (sister of Farley Guy): Elvis had a very big heart and he was a loving person. Since I was three years younger, he always treated me like a kid-sister. When he began taking ROTC at Humes, he would come home after school, all dre3ssed up in that uniform. He was so proud of being in the ROTC, so proud of that uniform and he had to show it off some kind of way and I guess this was how he did it.

Image
in ROTC uniform at Lauderdale Courts, backyard under the windows of his home

Image
Elvis in his ROTC uniform (last row, middle)

Image
Elvis, dressed in his ROTC uniform attends junior speech class in 1951 (center, back row)

Image
Elvis was very active in this speech class (last row, 2. From right)

Miss Mildred Scrivener (Elvis’ home-room teacher): To our Variety Show his senior year, we had thirty numbers and no time for individual encores, so I said that the one who got the most applause could take the encore. I’ll never forget Elvis’ look when he got it. His face lit up and he said, “Oh Miss Scrivener, do they really like me that much?”
In.1955, he stopped the day before Christmas vacation started to bring a present to Mrs. Scrivener and have a talk. Mrs. Scrivener chuckled at the recollection. “Kids were clustered around him, asking for autographs, and I was ready to stand right in line with them. My little niece who lives in Oshkosh had made me promise I would. Elvis when saw me, shouted “Here’s Mrs. Scrivener” and broke out of the crowd to talk. We think a lot of him, and we’re happy that he too, has so much affection for us.

Elvis continued to feel a great affection for his teachers and a loyalty for his school. In 1955 he stopped the day before Christmas vacation started to bring a present to Miss Scrivener and to have a talk. He also attended graduation exercises that year. Miss Scrivener chucked at the recollection. “Kids were clustered around him, asking for autographs and I was ready to stand right in line with them. My little niece, who lived in Oshkosh, had made me promise I would. Elvis, when saw me, shouted “Here’s Miss Scrivener” and broke out of the crowd to talk. We think a lot of him, and we’re happy that he too, has so much affection for us.

P.S.: During Humes’ annual Minstrel Show, Elvis performed Till I Waltz Again With You (and probably also Keep Them Cold Icy Fingers Off Of Me).
Apparently he was the only performer this evening who got called back for an encore.

Image
Mrs. Mildred Scrivener, Elvis’ home-class teacher

Image

Miss Eleanor Richmond (assistant principle): He was a gracious, quiet boy and we were all aware of his deep religious convictions.


Luther Nall (friend): Elvis didn’t have a lot of friends in Humes, but after he became famous, a lot of Humes people became his friends, a lot of that, I believe came from the fact that he was such an individual; he didn’t conform to peer pressure. I didn’t care that he was an individual which is the reason we were such close friends, I guess. Even in those days, Elvis was a very sensitive, very compassionate person. He was an individual, no doubt about that. He was not swayed by other’s opinions. He thought his own opinions out and he would abide by them. He would never try to force his own opinions on others. We could talk and accept each other’s opinions, but he couldn’t talk to others because they were not willing to accept what he had to say. Elvis was a very strong-willed person. His real ambition was steered by compassion and caring and not by fame and fortune.

Image
Luther Nall

His class mate of 1953 remember Elvis:

Image

Carole Kimbrell:

Not long ago I saw in the Memphis Flyer that Lauderdale Courts were being restored as part of the beautification of downtown Memphis. My family came to Memphis from Water Valley, MS in 1951and moved into Lauderdale Courts, a community of beautiful apartments surrounded by broad vistas of grass and trees. The neighbors were mostly single mom families, handicapped adults, medical and law students and immigrant families. Apartments were inspected monthly to make sure they were being taken care of properly. It was a great place to live even though they were government subsidized apartments.
My sister June, my brother John and I enrolled at Humes High School. Our brother C. W. enrolled at Christine Grammar School. Humes was the biggest school we had ever seen. We were just poor country kids who had attended very small schools. We really didn't feel alone because we walked to school every day with dozens of neighborhood kids who couldn't afford to ride the bus either.
Relda Alpuente, Georgia Avgeris, Frank Simonton, Virginia Eddleman and Elvis Presley were some neighbors I remember well.
I was very shy and afraid of boys my own age. But, I remember having crushes on Frank Simonton and George Blancett. Virginia Eddleman's family had beautiful voices and sang gospel music. She took me to hear them once when Elvis was singing on the same program. Soon after that my sister June and I ran into Elvis at the Suzore #1. He sat down beside me and after a while I felt his arm slide across my shoulder. I was so scared that we moved to another row. One night he was singing at the Humes Talent Show. My friend Rose left me to watch the white elephant booth while she went up and checked out the talent. Elvis sang while I was taking care of the booth so I never did hear him sing at Humes.
I worked at St. Joseph Hospital after school as a nurse's aide to save money to go to nursing school. Elvis' mother Gladys usually worked on the floor above me. Sometimes we worked together. She was a pretty lady who talked about her son a lot. She wanted me to come to dinner, but it never worked out. She taught me how to care for patients in a kind and gentle way. She was a great role model.

Image

Ed "Rob" Robinson

My recollection of dear ole Humes was about a lot of wonderful things happening to all of us as we attended, the songs that were popular then, the note books that were passed around (I think they were called slang books) where a person's name would appear on a page and everybody had a chance to write on that page such as cute boy, stuck up guy, cute girl, etc., etc. About dances, first real important dates with the opposite sex, proms. How simple life seemed then. How a guy wouldn't even kiss a girl on the first date, hold hands maybe if he were brave and she was receptive.
I have in my office right now a magazine rack that Elvis and I made together in woodshop. So, I do remember Elvis but no more than I remember Jimmy Music, Billy Leaptrott, L. D. Ledbetter, Billie Mae Chiles or Rose Howell.

Image

Betty Jean Moore-Munson

My cousin, Dorothy Jackson, and I were monitors stationed outside the entrance to the library to make sure that students checked out their books properly and to maintain order in the hall between classes.
Whenever Elvis Presley walked by we would look at each other and laugh and giggle. (We both had a crush on him.) One day he walked up to Dorothy and asked her why we laughed when he walked by. She was so dumbfounded that she blurted out "It's because we think you are so good-looking." I guess he was surprised also; he just broke into a grin and walked away. I was just sitting there with the reddest face that a girl could ever have. Whenever I'm embarrassed, I blush so badly that I feel as though my face will ignite. My face didn't ignite but from then on whenever I would see Elvis coming down the hall, I would stick my face into a book and not look up.

Elvis and I were in Miss Alexander's homeroom in the 11th grade. She taught music, so the classroom was a music room. She divided our class into an "L" shape with boys on one side and girls on the other side. Elvis sat in the front row next to a guy sporting a Mohawk haircut. I sat in the second row of girls so I could see him very well and I often stared at him because there was something about him that I really liked. He didn't dress or act like the rest of the boys. He always had a lock of hair hanging to the side of his face.
He had a serious expression most of the time during the beginning of the school year. But, later in the year, he surprised us by playing his guitar before school several mornings. ……
He didn't sing; he just played. He was accompanied on the grand piano by another student, Warren Gregory. We really enjoyed the impromptu jam sessions, but we kept our eyes peeled for Miss Alexander because we weren't real sure how she would react to our choice of music. We never found out because she never showed up while they were playing.
Elvis was very polite and respectful to all the teachers. He always addressed them as "Maam" and "Sir". He seemed very shy and I identified with him since I was shy, too. It was a very special year for me.
I remember him driving a maroon convertible; I believe it was a Lincoln.
Sometimes He wore dark colored pants with a stripe down the sides. I found out later that they were part of his movie usher uniform

Image

Mary Sanders-Anderson

Elvis was in my 12th grade homeroom, Mrs. Mildred Scrivener, 12-5. She was not particular about whether we sat, stood or wandered around as long as we showed up for roll call. Elvis would lean on a desk and just pass the time of day with everyone. We all knew that he was different, very, very, different. But, we all had the same goal of graduating and getting out in the real world. We later found out just how different he was.

Image

Eddie Bryson

Everybody seems to have Elvis stories. I, too, have several stories as I lived down the street from him. I guess that one of the best was when George Klein, who helped Dewey Phillips, told us that he was going to play an Elvis recording that night. We went to the Bar B-Q drive inn on Thomas (the name escapes me) and waited for it to be played. Never did any of us think that anything big was ever going to become of him.

Image

Robert Bland

I really didn't have too many experiences with Elvis at Humes, although, I do remember going riding in his old car. We talked in the halls mostly. I got to know him better after we graduated.
I was working at Crown Electric when Elvis was hired as the delivery boy. We became friends. Our bosses told Elvis he should get rid of his guitar and do something useful. When he delivered materials to my job site one day we talked about his future. I told him that I would try to get him in the apprentice program if he wanted me to. He thanked me and said he was going to try his luck with music first because he really liked it.
I saw him later in his pink Cadillac a couple of times and on his motorcycle. His luck with music turned out to be pretty good.
I enjoyed my years at Humes. Most of us were poor and had to work during our high school years, but we had some pretty good times together and learned the basics to help us earn a living.

Image

Wlliam "Billy" Walker

Some thoughts about Elvis. We were both Mississippi boys who had come to the big city. We understood each other. We had shop together in the 10th grade. When we weren't working on our project, we spent our time in the bathroom pitching pennies. Elvis got so mad one day that he punched the shop wall and almost broke his hand. I never saw him do that again.

Image

Carolyn Woodward-Cobb

I was in Miss Mildred Scrivener's 12th grade home room with Elvis. He never had any school supplies. He borrowed paper from someone every day. He looked so different from the other boys who had crew cuts and blue jeans. He wore black pants and his hair always hung down in his face. He was always very polite.

Image

Ann Duncan Hearn

I have so many happy memories of "Dear Old Humes." About Elvis- After Ken and I married, I worked at the National Bank of Commerce in Memphis. During the time he was recording at Sun Studios, Elvis Presley came into the bank quite often with Bob Neal, his first manager. He was always very friendly to me. He came in about a year after he was discharged from the Army. We had been talking for about five minutes when 10 or 15 screaming women came running up. He gave me a hug and left quickly. I never saw him again in person

Image

Carolyn Jones-Davis

Like most Humes students I never thought much about Elvis. He was just a classmate I didn't know very well. But now the attention I get when people discover that I went to school with "Elvis" is fantastic! It is instant celebrity status.

to be continue....


Last edited by AngelEyes on Sun Nov 17, 2013 12:23 pm, edited 1 time in total.


_________________
The biggest part of Elvis Presley was his big heart. It was full of love for everyone
Offline
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Elvis at Humes High School
PostPosted: Mon Jan 28, 2013 10:12 am 
Flame
User avatar

Joined: Tue Nov 16, 2010 10:40 am
Posts: 383
Image

Ken Hearn

I remember variety shows in the school auditorium (where Elvis sang, Gloria Trout danced, and Tommie Young won the "Male Beauty Contest").

Image

Lena Langley Cutrer

I had study hall with Elvis and a couple of his friends. They towered over most of the other kids., but then I was only five feet tall, so everybody looked taller than me. He was very shy. We had English together in our senior year. I remember we acted out a Shakespearean play "Julius Caesar", I think. Elvis was assigned the biggest part because of his deep, rich voice.
After graduation I moved away from Memphis. When I returned for a visit a couple of years later, Mary Frances told me that Elvis had made a record and they were playing it on the radio stations in Memphis. Within a few months the record was being played all over the country. We all know the rest of the story.

Image

Bob Haley

SOME OF MY ELVIS STORIES-
My favorite high school memory of Elvis came when I was playing in the senior band. The band put on a minstrel show and I was one of the end men cracking jokes and doing skits. (Can you imagine me, the white-haired one with a black face?). My name was at the top of the program in capital letters. Elvis was half-way down listed in smaller letters as "Elvis Prestley, Guitarist". They misspelled his name. I bet that was the last time they spelled his name wrong. I guess that is my big claim to fame, that I once had top billing over Elvis.

After graduation and after RCA bought Elvis' contract from Sun Records, Elvis became so well known, he had a difficult time going anywhere without being mobbed. He would pay to have the lights turned on at a local park and invite a bunch of us to come and play touch football with him.

One night when his chauffeur drove up in the black Cadillac limousine he had purchased the year before at Southern Motors for $11,000, Elvis told us that during the week, he had gone to see about trading it in on a new model. They only wanted to give him $4,000 for his trade-in. They told him that nobody but a funeral home or a damn fool would want one. Elvis said, "I'm no funeral home, so what does that make me?" Can you imagine what that limo would be worth today?

After the touch football games, Elvis made arrangements with the Fairgrounds to hold over a skeleton crew after regular hours. We would all go over there and ride all the rides we wanted as many times as we wanted and eat and drink anything they had at the concession stands. Elvis paid for everything. This went on all night. At daybreak Elvis would go home and we would clean up and go to work. Sometimes we didn't make it to work.
Another thing Elvis liked to do was rent the Memphian Theater. They would show three first run movies and keep the refreshments available all night. He would go home at dawn and we would drag off to work. What a tough life we had! Ha!

Image

Don Sage

I have heard or read stories related to Elvis Presley and Humes High School that "Humes was a school in the poor industrial area of Memphis." Nothing is more untrue. Many of our parents held jobs at the best paying large industries and companies located within the Humes boundary area.
Students came from a wide range of income levels from high-middle to extremely low. Households were probably evenly split among those different categories. Elvis Presley was in the extremely low income level, living in the public housing project, Lauderdale Courts.
Miss Scrivener was also my home room teacher. I was the class treasurer and collected dues of 25 cents a week from each student. Elvis Presley was in my homeroom, but he was never able to pay the first 25 cents.
In 1956, Elvis Presley put on a show in a packed Humes Auditorium. He paid all the expenses so the proceeds could be used for student activities. Elvis' show probably brought in more money than the school could have made in years.

Image

Rose Howell-Klimek

After church on Sunday night, my friends and I liked to go to Leonard's Barbeque on Bellevue and then to East Trigg Baptist Church to listen to the spirituals. The church had a special section for white visitors. Elvis Presley was often there and occasionally sang with the choir. I loved to watch the people who got the spirit dance and roll in the aisles. I guess that's where the term "holy rollers" came from.
Other Elvis stories: He was in the study hall where I called the roll. As soon as I called his name he would get up and leave. Then I would go downstairs to cashier in the lunch room. He was usually my first customer and always bought the same thing - two ice cream sandwiches.
One night he showed up at a school event wearing black clothes and pink socks. Miss Richmond didn't recognize him and asked me who that rogue was. Later she liked to brag that she always knew that Elvis would make it big.
After he became famous, he would ride around Memphis incognito in a panel truck. Sometimes he drove through my neighborhood and would stop and chat if he saw me walking down the street.
My daughters, Roxanne and Rozanne, went to Hillcrest High School with Elvis' stepbrothers. We had parties in our back yard which Ricky and Billy attended. Several times Elvis dropped them off in one of his fancy cars and created quite a stir in the neighborhood

Image

Robert Wayne Millican

It has been over 50 years since I attended Humes for 6 years., but I still remember the school, the teachers, my friends and most of the students in the class of 1953.
I knew Elvis about as well as anyone in the class, having met him in 1948 when he moved to Memphis from Tupelo, Mississippi. His family settled in the Lauderdale Courts area and he enrolled at Humes. Later we attended church together at the First Assembly of God Church on McLemore Ave.
In the eleventh grade Elvis and I were in Miss Thompson's Civics class. He was a class clown and in the middle of our mid-term exams with everyone concentrating on the test, he called from the back of the room in a loud voice "Miss Thompson, Miss Thompson," "What Elvis?" she answered. Then he asked "Why did the chicken cross the road?" The whole class broke up laughing except, of course, Miss Thompson. She quickly replied "See me after class, Elvis!"
I have great memories of those days and I wish I could share them all. I am proud to be a member of the Humes High Class of 1953 and to have so many fine men and women as my classmates.

Image

Lilian David Hicks

I truly loved all of my classmates, each special in his or her own way. It was so wonderful seeing some of them at the 35th Class Reunion. We were invited to a fantastic event where we heard the Jordanaires (Elvis' backup group), T. G. Sheppard and Rodney McDowell perform. Elvis fans asked for our autographs.
In January, 2003, I came to Memphis to attend the Humes 53 Revisited Elvis Birthday Dance at the Peabody. I wore a poodle skirt with saddle oxfords and pink socks. I felt transformed back to the 50's. I saw George Klein, the president of our class, and many other treasured classmates. It was a magical night. I knew Elvis very well, but I am saving those stories for our Humes Memory Book which the Class of 1953 is going to publish.

Image

George Carros

I met Elvis at Humes but I knew him better at the cafe. He was a very polite young man who neither looked nor acted like the rest of the guys. He would come into the cafe with a bunch of young girls from Lauderdale Courts and play the juke box, eat chips and drink cokes. His hair hung down in his face and he was often dressed in very bright colored pants. The girls liked him even then. But that didn't keep them from flirting with my brother and me. He always called me "Champ". The last time I saw him was right after his mother died. We ran into each other on Beale Street. We had a nice chat, shook hands and he said "Bye, Champ" and got into his waiting limo.

Image

George Grimes

ELVIS: I am an eye witness to the fact that Elvis would make those moves that only he could make when he was walking down the halls of dear old Humes. He complimented me on a solo I sang for the Honor Society. We were in a talent show together and I liked to brag that I shared the same stage with him and didn't have to pay to see him perform. Billy Wooley, Dwight Malone, Sydney McKinney and I were a quartet. Everyone in the talent show got to make a trip to the University of Mississippi. I saw a bunch of students hassling Elvis about his hair and odd clothes and I didn't take up for him. I always felt guilty about that. I wonder if those kids remembered that incident after Elvis became the most famous entertainer of our time. He was and is unique.

Image

Dennis Wilson

I don't have any Elvis stories. I really didn't know him well. I think the only class we may have had together was first year ROTC. I do remember him singing in the amateur night competitions and thought that he could sing very well.

Image
Elvis at ROTC - upper row in the middle

to be continue....


Last edited by AngelEyes on Mon Jan 28, 2013 11:38 am, edited 2 times in total.


_________________
The biggest part of Elvis Presley was his big heart. It was full of love for everyone
Offline
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Elvis at Humes High School
PostPosted: Mon Jan 28, 2013 11:36 am 
Flame
User avatar

Joined: Tue Nov 16, 2010 10:40 am
Posts: 383
Image

Jean Johnson George

Elvis dated my cousin, Jonell Johnson, a few times while they were both at Humes. (She was younger than he). Once when he went over to her house, they used her dad's car for a date. When they got home, her dad checked the mileage and they were both in hot water for a while. Elvis brought my brother home on his motorcycle once. He was really a thoughtful guy.
My husband, James Mancel George, went to Humes from the 7th through the 9th grades. He was just a young country boy from Senatobia, Mississippi. He was scared, but he made friends quickly. He and Elvis became good friends and worked together downtown at the movie theater. They usually walked home together. He helped Elvis with his first paper route. He and Elvis worked at MB Parker on Thomas Street for a while after graduation. They often ate lunch at a small place down the street. Elvis drank 3 big milk shakes one day and we really had a good laugh about that.
Even though we all moved in different directions, Elvis remembered his friends as long as he lived. Many years later, my husband was in Lake Tahoe to see Elvis perform. Elvis invited him backstage and they talked about old times. They were very happy to see each other.

Image

Dwight Malone

Elvis was different. Most boys had crew cuts and wore tee shirts and blue jeans. Elvis would appear at school in a pink jacket and yellow pants and a ducktail haircut. He was quiet, very courteous and largely stayed to himself. I did play touch football with him on the triangle at Lauderdale Courts. He was not fast but he had very quick movements. He had those swivel hips even then. When he caught the ball, he was difficult to tag. He could swivel out of reach in a moment. To tag him, a player had to grab him and hold on until he could apply the tag.

Elvis and Warren Gregory were close friends. Warren was musically gifted. He could play a piano beautifully, the guitar, the trumpet and any other available instrument. He never took a lesson. He could play any tune he heard and improvise the melody. During the summer months Elvis and Warren would sit on the street curb, strumming their guitars and singing country songs. Frankly, in their early attempts, they were not that good. I think they had a few shoes thrown at them by the neighbors.
It was at the Humes Talent Show in April, 1953 that I realized that Elvis could really sing. I remember our barbershop quartet singing. I remember Gloria Trout, a gorgeous little blond dancer who was also a cheerleader. But mostly, I remember Elvis. There were no swivel hips. His props were a chair, a guitar and a loud costume. He put one foot on the chair, strummed the guitar and sang his heart out. To me, that was when rock and roll was born. The ovation was thunderous and long. After graduation I went into the Army and was stationed in Germany. When I returned in 1956, Elvis was a huge star and many boys were wearing pink jackets, yellow pants and ducktail haircuts.

Geneva North- no pic

I loved the talent shows. I remember Elvis singing "Old Shep." We just sat there and giggled at him and everybody else who performed. We were so young and everything seemed funny. I remember watching Robert Lyles and Arthur Hightower slug it out every afternoon by their lockers and then come back the next day the best of friends. I loved to watch Davie Lee Lawrence play football. I had a crush on him in the third grade. I never dreamed that Elvis and George Klein would become entertainers. They were always so quiet. I did see Elvis in 1954 in a drugstore at Adams and Manassas. He walked me home and gave me his phone number which I never used. The next time I saw him, he waved at me when I pulled up beside him in my car. He was on a motorcycle with Ann Margaret.

Image

Norma Garner Coleman

I remember Elvis as a polite guy. He would speak each time we would pass in the hall. I can still see him dressed in a pink shirt trimmed in black and black pants with a pink stripe down the side along with his famous side burns, that strand of hair in the middle of his forehead and ducktails in the back. THAT WAS ELVIS! I saw Elvis and Red West in Newport News, Virginia in 1955. They were glad to see Sue and me. We had a great time catching up. The last time I saw Elvis and talked to him was on Audubon Drive. He was on his motorcycle and said he was leaving for Hollywood the next day to film Jail House Rock.

Image

Donald Morris

ELVIS: Elvis and I weren't buddies outside school hours, but we did have a few good moments at school. In Miss Jennie Allensworth's 12th grade English class we had assigned roles in one of the ever popular Shakespearean plays. Elvis, who sat behind me, and I, when our speaking parts came up, would pour it on with exaggerated southern accents (an oxymoron). Miss Allensworth warned us once, but being the showmen we were, we couldn't resist doing it again. She sent us out into the HALL for the rest of the period. Being sent in the HALL during class without an excuse was like being sent to purgatory - and if Mr. Brindley happened by - well watch out. Fortunately, it was close to the end of the period and we escaped unscathed. This was probably an early example of Elvis at his showmanship best; alas, perhaps I should have pursued other career paths.

Image

Bobby Horne Mitchell

My son Robert Allen Mitchell is writing these memories down for me. I can no longer write since I had a stroke, but I still have wonderful memories of Humes, Elvis and some interesting events in my life.
Elvis Presley and I were good friends and he liked to come over to my house because my mother would make him toasted cheese sandwiches and his beloved peanut butter and banana sandwiches.
After graduation, when Elvis was beginning to make a name for himself as a singer, I received a phone call from Miss Ginny Allensworth asking me to come over to Humes and help Elvis with his English because he had been invited to sing on the Ed Sullivan Show. I laughed and said, "Miss Ginny, Elvis wouldn't listen to me when we were in school and I doubt if he would listen to me now."
I did meet Elvis at Humes and he agreed to let me coach him. After talking for a while, he said, "Well, if you are so intent on helping me, why don't you come to New York, too, to be sure I do it right." I ended up backstage at the Ed Sullivan Show and got to see Elvis perform.

Image

Evelyn Huffmann Collins

The National Honor Society had a talent show at the school. We had many performances by our classmates. The winner of the talent show sang and played "Old Shep." His name was Elvis Presley. Little did we know Elvis would become so famous.
In 1956, I went to the Overton Park Shell to hear a country western group and Elvis sang and played the guitar. I enjoyed it very much and said, if Elvis got the right manager, he would do real well.
My favorite recording of Elvis is "Memories." I enjoy all his gospel music, his Christmas songs and many others.
When Elvis passed away in 1977, it was hard to believe at first. Elvis and other classmates were too young to have already left us. But they all gave us wonderful memories

Image

Mary Ann Probst-Coats

Elvis Presley was in Miss Scriverner’s home room with me. She was always bragging about how he would make it big one day. When he won the talent show singing “Old Shep”, she went on and on about it for days. Little did we know that what she predicted for Elvis would come true in such a huge way. When he was first becoming popular as a singer, he moved into some new apartments across from where I worked and we waved at each other almost daily, when he passed by in his first pink Cadillac. Soon after that he became world famous and bought his mother a house.

Image

Larry Holmes

At school I didn’t have much contact with Elvis, mainly passing in the hall. He lived upstairs at Lauderdale Courts and I visited a family downstairs in the same building frequently. I remember him in the talent shows. The most vivid experience I remember was at an English class party. Elvis sang ( this may have been before the talent shows) and the first time he twitched and moved, the bunch broke out laughing. We had never seen it before and did not expect it. I think Elvis was so into the song he didn’t even notice. I saw him downtown several times while I was working at the Cossitt Library and he had made his first record at Sun Studio. I saw him later at the Overton Park Shell when he opened for Slim Whitman and others from the Grand Ole Opry. The last time I saw him was at a concert in Abilene, Texas about 1973.

Image

Juanita Richardson-Mitchell

During my years at Humes I lived with my mother and baby brother in Lauderdale Courts. My mother worked at St. Joseph’s Hospital as a lab technician. I lived near Georgia Avgeris and Elvis Presley , as well as many other students from Humes.
About Elvis: Since Elvis lived near by, I did see him quite a bit, but we weren’t close friends. We were in the same homeroom and had a class together in the 12th grade. I remember one funny story. We were invited to a weiner roast at Mattie’s house. I rode with Elvis and his friends because they didn’t know where she lived. When we arrived, Mattie’s dad was "supervising" the festivities. When Elvis got out of the car and started, well, being his usual nutty self by taking off a silly floppy hat and slapping it against his leg and dancing around to the music, Mattie‘s dad was not terribly amused. He was sure that Elvis was drunk. We convinced "Dad" that Elvis wasn’t under the influence; he was just "normally" that way!
After Elvis became well known, I saw him in Lowenstein’s Department Store. I didn’t want to bother him ( I figured that enough people were doing that already) so I walked on by. Then I heard him say "What! Aren’t you speaking these days.?" I turned and said "Sure- I just figured you wouldn’t want to be spoken to!" He laughed and said "My friends will ALWAYS be my friends." We had a nice chat, right there in the middle of the store. It was nice to catch up.

Image

Marilyn Wade-Simpson

I don’t have too many memories of Elvis, but I do have his signature in my yearbook. I remember him at the Annual Minstrel Show. I invited my boyfriend, Jim Simpson, who was pretty bored until Elvis walked out on the stage with a chair in one hand and his guitar in the other; then he got interested. Elvis put his foot on the chair and started playing. The PA system was poor and we couldn’t hear his voice very clearly, but we were impressed. Jim likes to claim that he made some comment like, "That boy will go far." My sister once double-dated with Elvis and his girlfriend. They went to the Fairgrounds to ride the roller coaster. Elvis borrowed 25 cents from my sister for one of the rides. After he became famous we used to tease her about writing him and asking for interest on her "loan."

Image

William Larry Cule - by G. + M. Blancett

During his senior year Larry and I had Miss Moss’ 5th period American Problems class together with Elvis Presley. One day Miss Moss got so fed up with Larry and me she told us to take the rest of the day off and go to the athletic room. She allowed Elvis to tag along.
The three of us went riding in Larry’s red 1940 Studebaker that didn’t have a reverse gear. During our ride around town, we went somewhere to get Elvis’ guitar; he sat in the backseat playing and singing. Larry and I were both impressed with his songs, although I was more impressed, I think. Larry was also a talented singer.
We talked about the upcoming talent show where Larry and I were appearing with several boys doing gymnastic things. Elvis said, "I’ll warm them up for you."
When that night came, he did warm them up! After a couple of his scheduled songs, the audience response demanded he sit on the apron and sing a few more. The show really finished when Elvis did, but we went on and performed our act without much distinction.

Image

Fannie Mae Crowder-Caldwell

I would go with Carolyn and Rosemary to a dance club in East Memphis. I was very shy and wasn’t much of a dancer; so I just went along to watch the other girls dance. If Carolyn found a good partner, the dance floor would clear out and everyone would watch them dance. Carolyn was an excellent dancer. The person who taught Carolyn to dance was Elvis Presley. I think he had a crush on her for a while. He would find us in the hall and at lunch and various other places. He always wanted to talk to Carolyn, so I made myself scarce. Sometimes I had to walk to my sister’s apartment when my mother had to work late. Elvis and I would walk along together since he lived close by. We were both fairly quiet and did not say much. I found Elvis to be a nice boy who was a little shy.

Image

James (Jim) Thomas

ELVIS: I remember Elvis from Humes; but we were not close friends. I went to see his concert in Baton Rouge in 1975. I ran into Red West backstage and he took me to see Elvis. After a nice chat, my friend and I were invited to their hotel for a visit. Elvis’ entourage had reserved the entire top floor of the hotel and I must say, those folks knew how to party. We had a great time.

Image

Gloria Trout Sawyers

ELVIS: I had 12th grade English with Elvis and recall how nice and polite he was. His hair and clothes were unique and he had his own style (he did it his way) even then. His talent before his fame was already shining and he put all his efforts into his performances at the talent and variety shows and received thunderous applause.

Image

Mattie Rainey-Smith

Elvis: I never dated Elvis, but we were good friends. I helped him pass a couple of subjects. He came to my house once with some of my other friends and wound up being the life of the party. When I was riding the bus to school every morning, I would usually see Elvis sitting at the corner of Alabama and Poplar, listening to a black man in a chair playing a guitar. He wanted to play and sing like that man. He was a country boy with big dreams. After he became famous he did something to thank every person who ever helped him in any way. I knew his cousin Bill Mann, who was also a hair dresser. He and Elvis were very close.

Image

Vernon Graham

Elvis: One year, I think it was the 10th grade, he sat in front of me in the big study hall. His hair was extra long. We were talking and I asked him why he didn’t get a haircut. He said he had nothing to get one with. I walked around with the cigar box that pencils were stored in and collected enough for him to go to the barber shop. The next day when he sat down in front of me, I asked him why he didn’t get his haircut with the money. He said he did. He only had it trimmed. That was Elvis! I still have my Humes Herald, signed by Elvis. Must be worth a few bucks by now!

Image

Georgia Avgeris-Scarmoutsos

Elvis Presley was our neighbor in Lauderdale Courts for many years. He really liked my mother’s homemade hot Greek bread, and ate more of it than I did. Mama liked him, but did not understand the way he dressed- which was mild compared to today’s standards. Elvis worked at Loew’s State and I worked at the Malco, so we exchanged free tickets. We had a lot of fun with that. He made sure I got the best seat available. We had several classes together and in our senior year, we were in the same homeroom. He sat behind me and threw gum wrappers at me to get my attention. He was fine and genuine, and did not bother anyone.


to be continue....



_________________
The biggest part of Elvis Presley was his big heart. It was full of love for everyone
Offline
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Elvis at Humes High School
PostPosted: Mon Jan 28, 2013 12:47 pm 
Flame
User avatar

Joined: Tue Nov 16, 2010 10:40 am
Posts: 383
Image

Lillian Jenne Sommerfield

About Elvis: When Elvis first started to Humes, he was really poor. The office sent a letter home about a classmate who couldn’t come to school when the weather was bad because he had holes in his shoes, had no warm coat and needed a haircut.
It didn’t name him, but we all knew who it was. My mom gave me a whole dollar (WOW!) and a jacket she had bought for my brother Bill (she explained that she would get Bill another jacket when my dad got some overtime). I was so proud to take the jacket and the money to the office. My parents had hearts of gold.
The day we got our annuals, I asked Elvis to sign mine. I handed him my pen and he said he didn’t do well with a pen so he signed it with a pencil. He wrote "To Lil, With Love, El". No, we were not close friends- I guess it was quick and easy.
I didn’t sell my annual in 1978 when an offer came in the mail, but shortly thereafter it disappeared. My daughter thought that her brother might have sold it.
In 1990 he said to me, "Mama, do you want me to tell you what happened to your annual?" I nearly flipped because I thought he was going to confess he sold it. He explained that when he was in the 10th grade, he told some friends that I had graduated with Elvis and they didn’t believe him. He took my annual to school to show them. He was driving a little hatchback and had left the back open. It rained; the annual got wet; the pages swelled up; and Elvis’ penciled autograph faded out. He was so scared he threw it in a dumpster on the way home. My daughter still thinks he sold it, but I don’t think he could have made up a story like that.

Image

Shirley Hubanks-Scott

Elvis: The first time I saw Elvis perform was at the Male Beauty Show at Humes.
Elvis asked me to sign his yearbook, and I asked him to sign mine. He couldn’t believe that I wanted him to sign mine. Elvis’ mother and my grandmother worked together at St. Joseph’s Hospital. Buddy, Teresa and I visited Graceland several times during the early years that Elvis lived there. My mother, Katherine, and I had the pleasure of being the guests of Elvis and Red West for a weekend at the Sahara Hotel in Lake Tahoe, Nevada in May, 1973. The opening night party was spectacular. Elvis never forgot his roots or his friends. I saw several of his concerts before he died. He was a great entertainer and a good friend.
George Klein comes to the Elvis Festivals in Tupelo (where I now live) and we have fun talking about the old days and catching up with what is going on in our lives.
I was born in Memphis, TN, and Elvis was born in Tupelo, MS. I guess I could say that Elvis and I changed places. I hope Elvis is as happy as I am.

Image

Virginia Eddleman-Blackford

I had study hall with Elvis Presley (the flirt). He would blow kisses across the room at me. Once I thumbed my nose at him and said some smart remark back.
Everyone knows how Elvis loved "GOSPEL MUSIC." At Ellis Auditorium, the Statesmen Quartet felt sorry for him because he couldn’t afford a ticket and let him in the back door. My brother Jerry, my sister Darlene and I were called "The Eddleman Trio". We started singing acappella at ages 7, 8 and 11. After Elvis became famous, it occurred to me that "we" were singing on the stage while Elvis was sneaking in the back door. He later sang on the same stage at benefit concerts.

Being an Elvis classmate is very special in Peoria. When Elvis died in 1977, my picture was on the front page of the Peoria Journal Star along with an article. One of my sons had called the newspaper to report we were friends in high school. Then, on the 25th anniversary of his death, there was a huge color picture of me and another article on the front page mentioning my friendship with Elvis. They made a big deal out of Elvis rubbing suntan lotion on my back and asking me for a date. I have done some entertaining on radio station WMBD in Peoria. I was billed as the only female Elvis impersonator in the world and I did a pretty good rendition of Al Jolson’s "Mammy." I made up jingles and talked to the DJ’s on a regular basis. I had a wonderful time on the radio.
I hope ya’ll have enjoyed some of my stories and I want to say a special " HELLO" to Carole Kimbrell and Georgia Avgeris, from our Lauderdale Court days. Thanks to Rose and everyone else who took the time to put our memories together. As Elvis would say, "Thank you, thank you very much."

Image

Peggy Fiance-Henry

WHAT I REMEMBER ABOUT ELVIS
Tommy Young took me down to WHBQ to Dewey Phillips’ broadcast, "Red, Hot and Blue." Elvis was in one of the sound rooms; George Klein and Tommy were helping Dewey. I was just there. Tommy told Dewey I was a little church-going girl and to watch his language while I was there and he did. I understand that was not normal. Thanks, Tommy.
I took my younger sister and 2 brothers downtown to either the Loew’s Palace or Loew’s State one time early in Elvis’ career. Elvis came to see the movie. He sneaked in one of the exit doors with a bunch of guys after the movie started so he wouldn’t be mobbed by fans. When they were finding seats, my little sister looked up, recognized him and yelled, "It’s Elvis!" No movie that day for Elvis or his friends. They left quickly.
My husband’s cousin, Carolyn, was a good friend to Elvis and Priscilla. She came by one day to show me the doll house she had for Lisa Marie. It would be her first doll house and she was taking it over to Graceland that night.
My daughter, Pam, had bought tickets for Elvis’ concert in Memphis. He died before the concert. She has kept the tickets along with my ‘53 Annual which Elvis signed. We have had so many calls to buy it, but she has opted to keep that "book".
No matter where I travel, when people find out that I’m from Memphis, they ask about Elvis. One time while attending a church in Paris, France, we were invited to attend a luncheon after the services. The pastor spoke English, but most of the congregation did not. Some Cameroons from Africa, who had a leading restaurant in the city, were catering the meal that day. The visitors were called up front and asked us to say a few words which the pastor would translate. When they discovered I was from Memphis and Elvis went to my school, the questions, which I could not understand, were flying. The Cameroon lady, who owned the restaurant, hugged me telling me in broken English how much she loved Elvis. It was the same anywhere and everywhere I traveled. MEMPHIS---ELVIS.
At the time of Elvis’ death, my husband was a plains clothes Detective for the Memphis Police Department. He and a number of uniformed policemen were assigned to Graceland to provide extra security until the funeral and even after Elvis was buried because of threats and rumors about stealing the body. Elvis was later moved to his final resting place at Graceland.
Elvis did a lot of good things for a lot of people, but was caught up in a world hard to live in normally. He had a good Christian background, but a difficult road to travel because of his fame

Image

Arma Jean Hewlett-Perry

About Elvis: I didn’t know him very well. I do remember "THE VARIETY SHOW. " I could not believe what a beautiful voice he had. If I mention I went to school with Elvis, it is like instant credibility. They want to know every thing I remember about Elvis. That doesn’t take long.

Image

Billie Ann Banks-Pilalas

I thought of when the English class read MacBeth. Miss Jennie Allensworth assigned the part of Macbeth to Elvis Presley, who promptly said, "Aw, Miss Jenny, you know I can’t read." Of course you know who was assigned Lady MacBeth, not only was I embarrassed about the part, but the words I had to read. Nevertheless we both survived it. Apparently Elvis was much better in his role than I was.
There was another memory about Elvis about ten years after graduation. I had taken a group of junior cheerleaders, which included my sister Donna, to Graceland. Elvis came out on the porch and greeted us and the cheerleaders did their "Elvis shake" (the old Humes High shake) for him. I had my annual with me and he asked to borrow it for a while and when he returned it, he had written "To Billie Ann, Many Thanks, from Elvis Presley" I never tell what he was thanking me for when asked. I just smile coyly.

Image

Betty Diepholz-Loveless

I was President of the History Club in Miss Scrivener’s 12th grade class. She assigned me the task of getting Elvis to sing at our class party at Overton Park. He did and we all enjoyed the party and the singing. A few of us, including Elvis, climbed into L.D. Ledbetter’s car and went downtown to enjoy the Cotton Carnival. We rode the rides and hung out on the steps of the downtown library to listen to Elvis sing again. This attracted a crowd - the police came along and dispersed the crowd and we went home. Later, when we were signing yearbooks, we laughed about that night. Elvis wrote in my book "Remember Me - Elvis." Ironic that we all remember Elvis.

Image

Tommy Young

I really had a wonderful time at Humes High School. Most of the class mates who have written their memories have covered much of what I remember. The thing that is hard to believe is the number of class mates who have passed away. it shows us that we are just passing through life and we need to make every day count. The longer live the more I realize how great our class was, is.#
After Humes i went to colleg for 3 years. I was fortunate enough to run around with Dewey Phillips, D.J. at WHBQ Radio & TV's Red, Hot and Blue for several years and then traveled with Elvis until he went into the army. It was one of the best times in my life.

Image

George Klein - President of the Senior Class of 1953

My years at Humes were the golden years of my life. Being elected president of the Senior Class was a great honor I still cherish. Miss Lochrie, the speech teacher, put me on the road to my dream. My experiences as editor of the Humes newspaper and yearbook helped me immensely. Working in the radio booth at WHHM at Humes football games got my foot in the door for my radio career. I could almost write a short book on my life at Humes.
Whenever I see Coach Boyce’s wife, I think of Coach Boyce and all those glory days in football. I often see Tommy Young and L.D. Ledbetter and we flashback to our good old days at Humes. I return to my old neighborhood from time to time when I am filming some footage on Elvis - last time was 2 summers ago for Belgium TV. It’s so sad to see the area run down, but the old school is still standing and we must keep it there for history’s sake. Rock on Humes Hi!
Note: George has had an amazing career in radio, TV, movies and as an entertainment consultant. His dream was to be a disc jockey. He has far exceeded that dream. He has been in several movies including 8 Elvis movies, appeared on national TV shows such as Geraldo, Oprah Winfrey, 48 Hours and Entertainment Tonight. He has been involved in several TV shows such as Route 66 and "Elvis: The Series". He spent 30 years as a Memphis disc jockey, 12 years as a local TV host, 12 years as host of the "Elvis Hour" on WHBQ radio and many other local productions. He has narrated and produced videos and other pieces for national and international distribution.

He is well known around the world. He has raised money for local charities for many years. He works as a host for the Horseshoe Casino in Tunica, Mississippi. He was selected by Billboard Magazine as the No. 1 Disc Jockey in Memphis in 2003 - still on top after 50 years.

Image

Edwin Leek

My Elvis Stories: I gave Elvis $4.00 to make his first Dub at Sam Phillip’s Sun Records. It took him two months to get up the courage to do it. My idea was to make the record and knock on radio station doors to get it played and hopefully find him a singing job. Elvis was very unsure of himself in the early days of his career. I had a good time traveling, double dating, etc. with him until he went into the Army. He would call me to “round up” the bunch (about 16 total) to come to where ever he was to perform. He was afraid there wouldn’t be anyone there if we didn’t come.
He is still the only singer I listen to. I own the original Dub along with the music rights to it. I have allowed RCA and Disney to publish the music mainly so the fans can hear the two songs, which I felt, were very good. The record has all the elements that later developed into his personal style. I also still have the first commercial disk out of the labeling machine at Plastic Products on Chelsea Ave. (That‘s All Right and Blue Moon), which Elvis signed for me after I pulled it out of the collection box. I sold my Humes year book; my class photo and the little pink business card Elvis gave me ( to get back stage after he began famous) some years back for unbelievable prices. I figured they would be well cared for by Elvis collectors. I am considering letting the commercial record and perhaps the Dub find new homes soon. I am 70 years old and have no family except my wife to give them to. I have enjoyed them for over 50 years, along with my memories of Elvis..

Image

Shirley Loskove-Halpert

It was a privilege to be in the Humes Class of ‘53. I’m still amazed when people stop me and say, "Did you really graduate with Elvis!" Good luck to all my classmates.


Tommy Young Image

I really had a wonderful time at Humes High School. Most of the class mates who have written their memories have covered much of what I remember. The thing that is hard to believe is the number of class mates who have passed away. It shows us that we are just passing through life and we need to make every day count. The longer live I must realize how great our class was, is.
After Humes I went to college for 3 years. I was fortunately enough to run around with Dewey Phillips, D.J. at WHBQ Radio &TV’s Red, Hot and Blue for several years and then traveled with Elvis until he went into the Army. It was one of the best times in my life.

Some more pictures:

Image
Elvis‘ Library Card

Image
At his first Year of Humes (I’m not sure about), 3. Row right – the last one

Image
Elvis became a member of Humes Certification class in 1950, 3. Row

Image
Elvis‘first year at Humes, became a volunteer library worker, back row right

Image
Elvis’ school Report Card, signed by his father, Vernon Presley

Humes was segregated for whites only by law and custom. All Memphis institutions were segregated. Black children who lived in North Memphis attended nearly Manassas High School, were singer Isaac Hayes graduated in 1962. Elvis never attended school with a black child and its unlikely any of his class mates did.
Humes fame is clearly because of Elvis. Available documents show that Elvis participated in a few extracurricular activities. Class mates and teachers call him as a shy young man. This image of Elvis as the shy, rather unknown student contrast sharply with the image of him as a flashy dresser who wore his hair long. He made his decision to be different and create a unique identity, a brave decision for teenagers.
Maybe Elvis was picked on by other students for his unusual hair style and clothing. Yet his behavior was still that of a shy, quiet student. George Klein described Elvis impact lie a “velvet hammer” – powerful, yet not threatening.

Image
Principle T.C. Brindley

Principle Brindley had the ability to judge students, such as Elvis, with a flexible mind. In 1956 he told magazine writers that “we allowed Elvis to follow his own bent”. He knew that Elvis treated everyone with respect, and did what his teachers asked him for.
Of course, Elvis was also known for something else – his musical ability. Again he didn’t seem to impose his will upon other students or teachers. He didn’t bring his guitar to school every single day. Only gradually, did the people of Humes even learn that he had musical talent.
Odd enough, he struggled in music appreciation class, but he did volunteer to sing to the class. The annual minstrel show of his late year, 195, was such a defining moment. He was still so unknown that his name was misspelled on the printed program.

Image
Nr. 16 – Guitarist – Elvis Prestly

In the fall of 1956, Elvis made a very public visit to Humes with his new friend from Hollywood, Nick Adams. He did begin a pattern of giving to the school. Principle Brindley has always managed a cash fund to discreetly give to a student who needs help (maybe one of them was Elvis). He consulted with Brindley over the years what was needed. In that way Elvis paid for new uniforms for the school band and for the ROTC units among other gifts. Each year Brindley would select a group of students to call upon Elvis at ‘Graceland. Elvis would visit with the delegation and present them his donation for the year. The patter of giving apparently ended when Brindley retired in 1967.

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image
Humes Graduation at Ellis Auditorium

Image

Image
This picture of Elvis is used for the Year Book of the graduation class on June 3, 1953

Image
Elvis’ High School diploma

Elvis became the most famous entertainer into history of the world, selling more records than any performer, more than 1.3 billion by 1987 – according to RCA.
Fame and fortune was his. He was one of the few people in history who was recognizable by a single name: ELVIS.
No matter, however, how high he climbed; he never forgot his Humes years or the real friends he made there.

Image
Humes High School

Tuesday, August 13th at 10:00a.m. was a very monumental morning at Humes! Former Humes High School graduates, Shelby County officials, Memphis residents, fans of Elvis Presley, and the news media were all in attendance at the Humes historic marker dedication ceremony. Robert Dye, the Graceland photographer was also in attendance at the ceremony to capture the historical event. The Humes Historic marker documents the historical significance of Humes as the alma mater of Elvis Presley. Radio DJ Mr. George Klein and Actor Mr. Red West are also recognized on the historic Humes marker.

Image

Image
Humes Marker, backside


Last edited by AngelEyes on Sun Nov 17, 2013 1:27 pm, edited 2 times in total.


_________________
The biggest part of Elvis Presley was his big heart. It was full of love for everyone
Offline
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Elvis at Humes High School
PostPosted: Thu Jan 31, 2013 9:34 am 
Jewel in the Lotus

Joined: Tue Apr 25, 2006 7:00 am
Posts: 1895
Location: Switzerland
WOW!! AngelEyes, thank you SOOOO much for that presentation!! I enjoy it THAT much!!!!!!!! Just Great! Great memories!!!!!!! :bouncy: :hello: (A)



_________________
Christine-Sarena

"ALL THINGS ARE POSSIBLE IF YOU ONLY BELIEVE"
Offline
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Elvis at Humes High School
PostPosted: Fri Feb 01, 2013 6:54 am 
Jewel in the Lotus
User avatar

Joined: Thu Jun 01, 2006 7:28 am
Posts: 4625
Location: Spain
I LOVED YOUR PRESENTATION, ANGELEYES! :)

THANK YOU SOOOO MUCH!
:love:

We'll have to wait the book they are putting together on Humes High School and Elvis to have more detailed tales... It becomes obvious that they are saving information for it, as one of them comments, but I'm grateful to them just with what they are telling... :D

There's something that never before came to my knowledge: Elvis was clowning around already back then! :P



_________________
Amanda Viola

Elvis said: "LOVE is what it's all about." :*::*: Now I know it's true.
Offline
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Elvis at Humes High School
PostPosted: Sat Feb 02, 2013 8:19 pm 
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Sat Oct 29, 2005 6:47 pm
Posts: 4300
Location: California
Yes this is really interesting and more revealing of his background, attitude and how he came to be the young man who became the "King"! It goes back to what he spoke of, working cutting grass to buy shoes for himself so his mom would not have to worry about that. And being poor but not feeling that they were so much because everyone else lived as they did in Tupelo, but in Memphis it was different, he didn't fit in well, he said. He learned how, stuck it out and made his momma proud. right on there!
Thanks for putting this up, it's great to know they are going to make a book also, that should be really different and revealing of how he got to be HIM.

Barbara/Roselyn will not be able to fix her computer as the "mother board died".
It's at least two years old; I don't think lap tops are made to last-they make
money on sales, not repairs you know. Like cell phones...piles of them go into the dead boxes at Sprint etc... it's all about the money...
Anyway, she can't get on line, she has a small tv and I guess might be able to
play movies on it, but I'm not sure about that. She will be out and off line for
about 2 months because she isn't able right now to replace the computer but
plans to as soon as she can. She said to say hello to everyone and that she
will miss you all. I will call her now and then too, and pass on anything "new"
that she's missed. One thing about being off a while...boy is there a lot of reading to catch up on!
Love to all,
wjh



_________________
Wanda June Hill
author of "We Remember, Elvis" & "Elvis - Face to Face"
Offline
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Elvis at Humes High School
PostPosted: Mon Feb 04, 2013 6:30 am 
Jewel in the Lotus
User avatar

Joined: Thu Jun 01, 2006 7:28 am
Posts: 4625
Location: Spain
Sorry to hear Barb had to bury her computer... We'll miss her presence here.

Please Wanda, send her my love and best wishes for the recovery of possibilities to be and do whatever she may want to... like everyone should!

Sending her a whole wave of Golden Bubbles of ABUNDANCE and JOY.
:hello:



_________________
Amanda Viola

Elvis said: "LOVE is what it's all about." :*::*: Now I know it's true.
Offline
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Elvis at Humes High School
PostPosted: Mon Feb 04, 2013 3:36 pm 
Flame
User avatar

Joined: Tue Nov 16, 2010 10:40 am
Posts: 383
Oh, I feel so sorry for Rose-Lyn. Hope she will be able to replace her laptop to a new one and that she will be back as soon as possible.
Best wishes and my regards for her. Yes, we miss her . :hello:



_________________
The biggest part of Elvis Presley was his big heart. It was full of love for everyone
Offline
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Elvis at Humes High School - updated!
PostPosted: Mon Nov 18, 2013 3:41 pm 
Flame
User avatar

Joined: Tue Nov 16, 2010 10:40 am
Posts: 383
That's the updated version of my report. Hope everybody enjoy it.

:hello:



_________________
The biggest part of Elvis Presley was his big heart. It was full of love for everyone
Offline
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
 Page 1 of 2 [ 13 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next

All times are UTC - 5 hours [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  

cron
phpBB skin developed by: John Olson
Powered by phpBB © 2000, 2002, 2005, 2007 phpBB Group

This site is hosted by Free-Forums.org - get a forum for free. Get coupon codes.
MultiForums powered by echoPHP phpBB MultiForums