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 Post subject: Young Elvis, young dreams
PostPosted: Sat Mar 23, 2013 8:19 pm 
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A lot is told and wrote about Elvis‘ early days when his career starts. The following is the story of a young girl named Margie Marek and it gives a good inside look about the time when Elvis starts to became famous around 1954/55 and in my opinion the story is worth to share.

On a spring morning in May 1955, my alarm clock went off at 7.a.m. Another school day was about to begin. I rolled over and turned the thing off and lay there listening to the morning sounds , my mom singing her hymns (“Rock of ages, cleft for me, let me hide myself in thee”) and smells (coffee brewing, bacon and eggs frying, biscuits!). Getting up slowly, I was wishing school was already out for the summer. I felt sad and lonely because recently Dave and I had broken up. We had been together every summer since the seventh grade. I had been his Homecoming Maid. We had been nominated Favorite Couple, Ninth Grade, but didn’t win. I had returned his football jacket the week before. I was still upset and crying, dreading to see him. Having one class with him was awful. I decided to join a convent and become a nun – and I wasn’t even Catholic.

I received a letter from a close friend in another city only thirty-two miles away. We were the same age, in the same grade. She wanted me to spend the weekend with her and we would go see a new singer who was “absolute dynamite and extremely gorgeous!” I thought “Why not?” My girlfriend, Janet and her sister, Kay, met me at the train, both trying to talk at the same time, both telling me about this gorgeous singer. I wasn’t interested or enthused about going to see him. It all sounded boring to me. I had been hearing some of the girls at school talking about him, how cute he was, but also how vulgar he was! I had heard one or two of his songs on the radio and thought “not bad”. I had never seen him; not even a photo of him. So I was convinced I was going to be very bored and a wet blanket and that I would ruin Janet’s and Kay’s good time; spoil their fun. I was thinking of Dave and his new girlfriend. Janet’s parents laughed and poked fun at Janet and Kay over this singer. His name was funny and odd, they thought. They seemed amused by it all. We rushed through a supper to get ready to go to the Arkansas Municipal Auditorium in Texarkana early in order to get a good seat. I was still trying to get out of going, trying to get them to go to a movie instead. They wouldn’t hear of it, saying “Oh no, no, no, you have just got to see him, Margie”.
It was 5 p.m. when we drove up to the Auditorium. Only a few girls were there waiting close to the door. The show would not start until seven. I was thinking how stupid it was to arrive so early as more and more girls began to arrive, giggling, laughing, ooh-ing and aah-ing over this singer. I kept shaking my head in disbelief. I bet I asked Janet ten times what his name was – some unusual name and hard to remember: Elvis Presley. I had never heard a name like that before. We were standing at the door behind three other girls when we heard a car horn honk and we looked in the direction of the car. It was a 1955 pink and white Ford Crown Victoria. Some guy was waving and honking and stuck his right leg out the car window. Some of the girls were squealing and jumping up and down, and I looked in amazement and total disbelief at what I was seeing. The car stopped at the door entrance, the door opened, and the girls ran in every direction like a horse stampede. Wild! We hurriedly paid our one dollar admission and took off running. We didn’t get tickets then; just paid our admission and ran as fast and as hard as we could. We made it to the front row and luckily found three seats together to the left of stage, the side Elvis would come from when the curtain opened. We were lucky to get those seats, I thought. Janet had wanted front row center.
Tommy Sands, then a dis jockey at KCIJ in Shreveport, opened and did his Elvis imitation, trying to sound like Elvis and move like Elvis. He was real cute, but he wasn’t Elvis. After he left the stage, Jim Le Fan, deejay for KOSY in Texarkana, came on to try quieten the girls. The girls knew who was next.

You could feel the tension, the electricity in the air! Then Elvis came on, smiling and shading his eyes from the bright spotlights in the darkened auditorium. From the instant I first saw him, my mouth popped open. I froze. I couldn’t say a word, I could hardly breathe. I stared in total awe and disbelief on him. I couldn’t take my eyes off of him. It was like a spell was cast over me!. Janet and Kay were laughing at my reaction to Elvis, saying “see Margie, we told you so. Isn’t he a doll?” All I could do was nod my head “Yes”. I had never seen a boy so good looking in my life in the flesh, only in movies magazines. He was unbelievable! He looked so radiant. When he smiled, he lit up the whole auditorium. This was an experience I would never forget, and to think I almost didn’t go to the show. I didn’t even notice his band for a long time. All I could see was Elvis – nothing or no one else! Girls squealed and screamed. Some cried. When he spoke, a silence fell over the auditorium. You could almost hear a pin drop. We were afraid we would miss something he would say. A few rows back, some boys got rude and ugly and made awful noises, insulting Elvis. Before long, they were asked to leave. Elvis had a ball, and so did we. He was o-o-o-o gorgeous!
Later when I took home a photograph of Elvis, my mom looked at it and said “Why, he’ too pretty to be a boy. Whoever saw a boy with a heart-shaped mouth?”. As Elvis performed, he started throwing his clothes into the audience. I got my hand on his shirt, but so did the girl behind me. She got it. After he had thrown his shoes, his socks, belt and pocket comb into the crowd, he started throwing his pocket change, then sticks of gum (he always chewed Wrigley’s Spearmint in those days). All he left on by this time was his light blue slacks. After the show, Janet suggested we go backstage to get his autograph. I turned into jelly at the thought of it. When we got backstage , Elvis was laughing, talking and signing autographs bare-chested and barefooted. I just stood there staring at him; couldn’t take my eyes off of him. He looked up. Our eyes met. It was like a charge of electricity shot through me. He walked up to me and said “Hi, how did you like the show?”. I looked behind me, sure he was not talking to me. My legs felt like rubber. My heart was in my throat – pounding hard. He was standing so close in front of me, the whole world was just Elvis and me. He asked again “Did you like my show?” “Oh! Yes! I did!” I replied. Those beautiful eyes. So pretty . Heavy-lidded. Sexy. I was lost in them. He asked my name, where I lived, how old was I . “My name is Margie. I live in Hope (Arkansas), I’m visiting friends for the weekend. I’m (lying) .. eighteen”. Elvis grinned and said “Honey, you’re fifteen, if you’re a day. A child. A baby”. I was so embarrassed. My face felt so hot. I was blushing and Elvis started teasing me about it. “I don’t see many girls blushed anymore”, he said. “I didn’t think they did”.
Standing there without a belt, he could hardly keep his pants up. They kept sliding down. Once I spotted the top of his Fruit of the Looms. It was funny. He had them on wrong-side-out. I could see the label (Size 32-34) as clear as day. After signing all the autographs, he asked if we had eaten yet. We said “no”, so he said “ neither have I. Want to help me find a good place to eat?”. Did we?!!! He said “Let me go put on a shirt, some socks and shoes and we will go out to eat.” I was still blushing. As we walked away, he turned to me and said “Hold on that look”. Janet sreamed “Oh! Oh! He really likes you. Oh!” Oh Janet I said “I’m too plain looking for a boy that looks like that. He’s just being nice to me. That’s all”.
Soon, Elvis reappeared, more gorgeous than ever. He said he had called his Mom before she went to sleep. He asked Scotty and Bill to drive his car to the Park Plaza Motel. He left with us. We took him to Lee’s Drive-In, a popular hangout for teenagers. Elvis and I were in the back seat. Though he was sitting close to me, Elvis made no improper advances. He was a true gentleman in every sense of the word. I guess he saw I was worth of being treated like a young lady. He was nicer than some of the boys I went to school with or had dated. It really bother me during that time and through the years how how anyone could tell tall tales about his morals being those of an alley cat. Ministers, and some parents , wanted to keep him from performing in some cities because he was going to “corrupt” us young people. Nothing could have been farther from the truth! A lot of girls back then (in the fifties) would do weird and crazy things, like trying to get into his room by crawling through an open window (only to find they entered the wrong room). Elvis was getting the blame for these things because these girls surely weren’t going to own up to doing it themselves. Thus, many times Elvis was wrongly looked on and accused.

Anyway, there we were, the four of us, sitting in the car in the drive-in. Elvis ordered three cheeseburgers, French fries and two or three chocolate Milk shakes. He surely had an enormous appetite and was so hyper and so full of energy he tired us out just watching him. We had so much fun laughing and talking and joking as we ate. I had a terrific time – a time etched in my memory forever. Oh, I thought as I sat there, how I wished that time would just stand still! We took Elvis riding around and ended up on the parking lot of a not-so-nice-drive-in (knowing full well we would be up to our necks in trouble with our parents). Beer and alcohol were sold and rough-looking kids hung out there looking for trouble. This place had a very bad reputation. We rolled up our windows and locked the doors. Elvis was astonished at the looks of those kids. They spotted us and began to stare and started toward us. I told Janet “let’s get out of here” and she did just that. Fast. If some of those guys had recognized Elvis in our car, I shudder to think what could happened, what they could have done to him. We were afraid those boys would follow us. I was praying “Lord, if anyone gets hurt or killed, please let it only be me. Just don’ let anything happen to Elvis and us”. They didn’t follow us. At evening’s end, Elvis thanked us. He got out of the car, smiled and waved goodbye, and disappeared around the corner of the motel. Immediately a loud silence fell over our car. He was gone. It was like the moon and stars had quit shining.
The next day, we awakened at 8 a.m., dressed and got ready to go looking for Elvis, heading straight for the Park Plaza. We couldn’t find Elvis’ car anyplace. We went around the block and came back and there was Elvis washing his car at the Amoco station across the street from the motel. Recognizing Janet’s car, Elvis came over to my side of the car and leaned into the car window. He asked how we were doing and why we were up so early. We told him we were on our way to a record shop downtown and asked if he wanted to go with us. “Yeah, hold on a minute” he said. He left his car keys with the station attendant. We went to the record shop and took some records into the soundproof booth and played them. I bought a copy of Elvis’ Milkcow Blues Boogie and he autographed it, “Love ya, Elvis Presley”. As time passed, I would buy other Elvis r3ecords and he autographed them all the same way. We went to Lee’s Drive-In and got a hamburger. Elvis said he had to hurry back, load the car, they had to be off soon for the Louisiana Hayride show that night. As he left, he said “bye, y’all , hope to be seeing you again”. And I thought “I hope so”.

The weeks passed. The hot summer dragged on. All I could think about was Elvis. I tried to stay busy, but my life just wasn’t the same. Then news came that Elvis would perform in nearby Hope, Arkansas, soon. He was to appear at the Four States Fairgrounds, singing from a flatbed truck. Janet and Kay came to spend the weekend with me. Johnny Cash, George Jones, Jim Ed Brown and his sisters were also on the show. I learned later than none of them wanted to follow Elvis on the stage.

We arrived early to get good seats and be close enough to talk to him. He said he was going to a watermelon party after the show, asked if we would be there. That was the first time we had heard of the party. He left immediately after the show for the party. We checked on the party and were told no one under eighteen was allowed there. We then learned Elvis was returning to Texarkana soon. The excitement began mounting, as before; the excitement that only an Elvis Presley could cause and no one but him could create.
Once the doors opened, we raced down to the good seats on the floor row. Tommy Sands, as before, came out to do his Elvis imitations until Elvis arrived. Soon after Tommy left the stage, we saw Elvis stick his leg out from behind the curtain and this nearly brought down the building. This time, unlike before, they had security guards. Elvis appeared on stage smiling. His performance was even more electrifying than before. The girls screamed at every move, every sensuous wiggle. Elvis continued smiling, enjoying it all. He held us all captive under his spell. He had a very special way about him. When he spoke, the whole place got so quiet, afraid we would miss something he did – a move, a wiggle. After the show, we dashed backstage to get him to autograph our new Sun records. He saw us and came over to talk. The girls were knee-deep backstage and were envious when he came to us. I was just so happy to have him come to me, call me by name and ask ed how we all had been since we saw him last in Hope. He asked why we had not come to the watermelon party, laughing when we told him of its no kids policy. He said he had enjoyed the party and had eaten a lot of watermelon.
There was a really cute girl backstage. She was watching Elvis and he was watching her. Later, I learned she was nineteen and had her eon apartment. She had on a low-cut blouse, a really tight skirt, and was doing a little dance (then called the dirty bop). I felt threatened by her. Elvis left with this girl. We went home and played Elvis records until late. I had known this moment would come someday, but I sure didn’t think it would come so soon. The crowds were getting bigger. Wilder things were beginning to happen. I began seeing girls leave deep fingernails scratches on his back and chest grabbing for his shirts, tearing them off of him. The scratches would be deep and bleeding. Eventually, no one would be able to get near him, backstage or anywhere else. It was becoming too dangerous for Elvis.

........ to be continued



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The biggest part of Elvis Presley was his big heart. It was full of love for everyone
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 Post subject: Re: Young Elvis, young dreams
PostPosted: Sat Mar 23, 2013 8:20 pm 
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We learned Elvis was to be at a Texarkana radio station for an interview at nine the next morning. We were there at 8.30. He walked up and said “Hi, how are you doing?”. All we dcould say was “fine, now”. We watched the interview through the glass. That afternoon we went by the hotel just as Scotty Moore drove that pink Cadillac away. Elvis spotted us, smiled and waved and kept looking back at us. There3 was that empty, lonely feeling again. My eyes began to fill up with tears, my throat had a lump.
As the summer wound down, Janet, Kay and I went to as many close-by Arkansas and Texas towns as we could to see Elvis perform. The crowd kept getting bigger and wilder. Elvis continued to be terrific. He recognized me each and every time; that beautiful smile always flashed toward me. His shows were going into larger cities farther away from Texarkana. Near the end of summer, Janet’s and Kay’s parents took us to the Louisiana Hayride to see Elvis. We barely got decent seats. We succeeded in getting backstage, hoping to see Elvis coming from the dressing room, but the security people asked us to leave. Elvis walked out of his dressing room, saw us and started toward us. Other girls saw him and began pushing and shoving and security was trying to make everyone leave. “these girls (meaning us) are OK”, Elvis told the security. “They are my friends. It’s all right for them to be back here”. Quickly, Janet shot a picture of Elvis and me. She told us to move closer together and we did. Elvis put his hand under my chin and kissed me tenderly an , oh , so gently, on the lips. That was to be the last time I was to be that close to him. He turned and walked away, took a few step, turned and looked back and smiled at me. I knew this was a goodbye. When my parents saw the picture of Elvis and me, they complained that I had taken a photo with him and that the way he was holding me was indecent. My brother and sister were equally horrified. I cried and cried. My mom was vowing I would go to no more of his shows. I was crushed. As I (later) watched Elvis in Love Me Tender , I thought to myself “Oh, sweet Elvis, did you have to go so far away?”.

He came back to the Hayride in January 1956 to fulfill his contractual obligation. He could have gotten out of it. He was already a star, rising to fame and fortune. But he didn’t. He honored it.
We went to see him at that last performance. It was to be the last time I saw him perform live. I was glad and happy for him, so proud of him, but I missed him so much. I knew he was destined to become a star. Never did I dream he would become a legend.

Source: B. Burk - the Sun Years

Enjoy. :hello:



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The biggest part of Elvis Presley was his big heart. It was full of love for everyone
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 Post subject: Re: Young Elvis, young dreams
PostPosted: Mon Mar 25, 2013 1:53 pm 
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:hello: This was Such a Fantastic Story and While I was reading this Great Story, I Felt has though I was Living this Awesome Experience with this Girl. I don't know where your finding these Wonderful Stories, but Keeping on Posting them. :love:



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Without you I am nothing an could never be so bold. The times we've shared, the laughter and the tears. Priceless memories, treasures all. How could I ever fail? With you I don't fear that at all. Elvis Presley!
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 Post subject: Re: Young Elvis, young dreams
PostPosted: Tue Mar 26, 2013 8:26 pm 
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AngelEyes, I agree with Barb, that was a wonderful story. Thank you so much for posting and I do hope you have more for us to enjoy. Camille


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 Post subject: Re: Young Elvis, young dreams
PostPosted: Thu Apr 04, 2013 6:37 pm 
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It is very interesting to read of those early days and how he made people feel. Albeit mostly young ladies, but still enough adults were around to notice as well. He was definitely here for a purpose. His smile did light up a room, even a huge one! He paused to speak and dead silence filled big showroom sized rooms, he could look at someone and they would either freeze or come unglued, he would pause and talk with anyone whom he felt wanted to meet him when he could that is, he took time to spend hours and hours signing autographs most of his career. He would send flowers and gifts to kids and some people he heard were ill, in the hospital or if someone he read about needed something, he'd provide help even if it meant going in person to do it. This was a man who cared, who loved, and that shone from those sky blue eyes and touched anyone he looked at. He had a warm, voice that soothed, or if he wanted to, roused the soul when he sang. He lived quietly as he could considering the turmoil he could cause, and he always gave his God, the Father credit for every thing he became and had. He would say, I owe it all to God, and these people out there who like my music, and enjoy what I do. And he was and still is one of the most misunderstood and maligned human beings of our generations. Amazing! He knew it and he said of his detractors, "They got to make a living too, an' you know nice things don't sell, but dirt does." He was also extremely intelligent and very wise. wjh



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