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 Post subject: Elvis in Hawaii 1973 - Aloha from Hawaii
PostPosted: Tue May 28, 2013 2:30 pm 
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On 5 September 1972 interjected a hitherto unprecedented event its shadow ahead.
In the early morning hours, after the midnight show of 4 9, a press conference was held at the Las Vegas Hilton Hotel in which was announced an upcoming concert by Elvis in Hawaii, which would be seen via satellite around the world on television. However, it was more of a notice than a press conference. The announcement was made by RCA president Rocco Laginestra.

He told the press that the broadcast of the show have or will achieve the largest crowd ever in the history of television. The concert was broadcast live via satellite in Southeast-Asia and would be available in 28 European countries a day later. Elvis was also present and told the press that he hopes that he does not disappoint his fans.
(Interview - see Elvis in Hawaii in 1972).

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Elvis and Rocco Laginestra

There was another press conference on 20 November 1972, in which the date of transfer, namely the 14 January 1973 was announced. Likewise, it will be a benefit concert. Instead entrance fee for the show they would be available for Donations. All proceeds from the show - including souvenir sales - would benefit the Kui Lee Cancer Fund (see Elvis in Hawaii 1972). The targeted goal were 25,000 Dollar. As Kui Lee's widow, who also attended the press conference, heard that Elvis makes this concert in support for the cancer fund of her late husband, she was so excited that she needed a sedative from the doctor.

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Letter of Parkhill about the Aloha special

Kui Lee was a songwriter and singer, known also as "The Lenny Bruce of Hawaii. He was born on 31 July 1932 in Shanghai / China. His full name is Lee Kuiokalani. His mother died when he was four years old and he went with his father, a Hawaiian entertainer, at the aged of 5 years, to Hawaii. There he attended the Kamehamea Schools and is a graduate of Roosevelt High School.
His parents, Billy and Ethel Lee, worked both as an entertainer and therefore, he became interested very early for the show business. Later he went to New York and worked there for 10 years, with the last year and a half in the Hawaiian room at the Lexington Hotel in New York City. He appeared there as a fire dancer and was also a choreographer. Here he met his future wife Nani Naone - a hula dancer - with whom he has four children.
In the 60's he went back to Hawaii and there he started singing and composing.

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Kui Lee as Fire Dancer in N.Y.

He played in various Hawaiian clubs and places, such as at Kanaka Pete's on Maui, Kalea Gardens, Queen's Surf on Lanai and the Waikiki Shell, which made him a well known figure in the local music scene.
As a songwriter, he composed more than 200 songs, but he was best known by his biggest hit, "I'll Remember You," which he composed in 1964.

He signed a recording contract with Palm Records and made his debut with the song at Queen's Surf on Lanai. In the same year this song was recorded by Don Ho, Tony Bennett, Andy Williams, Roger Williams, and Herb Alpert's Tijuana Brass.
Other songs by Kui Lee were for example "One Paddle, Two Paddle""She's Gone Again", "Rain, Rain, Rain Go Away", "Yes, It's You," "The Days Of My Youth" and many others..

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Kui Lee and his wife Nani performing

On 18 October 1966 Kui Lee had his last public appearance, whose highlight the
appearance of his wife Nani at the"Wakiki Shell" during Aloha Week was - and there she performed his last composition "The Intangible Dream Came True".
Shortly after Kui Lee was diagnosed with throat cancer. After his diagnosis Kui Lee traveled to Tijuana / Mexico because there were cancer patients treated with - in the USA forbidden and controversial drug -"Laetrile". He died on 3 December 1966 with 34 years at the Guadalajara Hospital in Tijuana/Mexico. According to his last wish, his ashes were buried six days later at Waikiki in the sea.
In the same year Elvis recorded Lee's song "I'll Remember You" -on 10 June 1966
in Nashville and sang it in the "Aloha from Hawaii" show.

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Producer and director of the Aloha show was Marty Pasetta, who watched Elvis' show on 15.11.1972 in Long Beach / California and found the show to be boring because it lacked palpable tension and excitement. Marty Pasetta:" I expected to see a gyrating person moving all over the stage. He was far from that. He was staged, quiet”. He submitted Parker his ideas for the show and how they could make it.
Among other things, a catwalk of the stage should lead into the audience, so that Elvis would be closer to its viewers. Parker insisted that such ideas would be pointless and Elvis certainly agree with his opinion. Anyway, Pasetta decided to speak with Elvis personally about his ideas and was pleasantly surprised to hear that Elvis was happy about his ideas and he would do what was best for the show after Pasettas opinion. He said to Pasetta: "We're gonna make super magic for the tube and we'll do it together". And so they did.

For production reasons wanted Pasetta Elvis' musicians to place it on different raised platforms at the rear of the stage, but this were not accepted by Elvis. "Sorry Mr. Pasetta, I want my musicians with me on stage".
Alone on stage, face to face with over a billion TV viewers was probably harder than Elvis thought.

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Marty Pasetta

A new stage costume, which was destined for Las Vegas, did not meet Elvis' expectations. He wanted something very special for Hawaii and asked Bill Belew to design a completely new outfit. Something that expressed his patriotism. Belew designed Elvis' stage costumes as well as his private wardrobe. So Belew designed the most famous stage outfit, the Aloha Eagle suit.

The jumpsuit was white (better for the headlights) and in the front and on the back with an eagle, formed of red / blue and gold precious stones, embroidered and in accordance with the emblem of the United States - the eagle - should symbolize America. But the final touch or the icing on the cake was the matching cape. The fact is that Belew made two jumpsuits, three capes and three belts. A huge, floor-length and a(two), more practical, half-length cape.
Bill Belew remembers: "It was such a swashbuckling thing and he just had a way with it. Immediately he knew how he wanted to work with it, what he wanted to do with it". Belew has designed, suitable for stage costume, also a 4 inches wide, white leather belt. On the belts were ovals and eagles - crafted from precious gemstones.
The idea with the long cape was that during the intro, Elvis" was hidden" behind the Cape, appears on the stage and at the end of the intro, let down the cape, turns around to the waiting crowd and "revealed" him to them.
This huge and magnificent cape was 5 foot long, not to mention all the weight.

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The first, long version, of the Aloha cape

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Bill for 2 Capes - 1.position in the 1. version of the cape - the long one.

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Bill Belew

On 7 January 1973 started the ticket sale for "Aloha from Hawaii". The ticket office was open from 08.00 am to 17.00 pm. At this time, had already been sold 4000 from the 6000 available tickets by postal orders. The remaining 2000 tickets were sold out on the same day.
Although the hall usually had room for 8400 spectators, was due to the big stage - which was built specially for this show and was enormous in size - only room for 6000 spectators.
Wayne Harada reported on 8.1. in the Honolulu Adviser, that Col. Parker has decided, because of the great demand, that will be available now also tickets for the dress rehearsal on 12.1.
These cards were only against donations too. Parker said: "Could you still call it a donation, if a minimum price is set? Some of our fans cannot afford a large amount and that is the point that is important to us. If a fan can only give a dollar or two - so what? We will not reject him because of that. And those people who are keen to support the Kui Lee Cancer Fund, they shall of conviction and in its sole discretion donate an amount!". Also these tickets were sold out shortly after.
Some famous people (Celebs) bought tickets for the price of 100 or 500 dollars, which meant that the revenue from ticket sales far exceeded the wildest expectations. The extreme opposite was the case. A woman with five children got their tickets for the price of $ 3.75.

In a surprisingly short time, Elvis get in shape for the show - as desired by Pasetta. Elvis had 25 pounds taken off and - after the news that his record sales continued to rise and that the documentary "Elvis on Tour" was nominated for a Golden Globe - he was very confident about the show

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to be continue...



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 Post subject: Re: Elvis in Hawaii 1973 - Aloha from Hawaii
PostPosted: Tue May 28, 2013 3:57 pm 
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On January 1973 - one day after his 38th Birthday - Elvis landed in a chartered Boeing 747 at the Honolulu Airport on the island of Oahu. Elvis, his entourage (the Memphis Mafia and their wives) were met by Col. Parker and Sonny West at the airport. Elvis was directed to a Helicopter, which took him to the Hilton Hawaiian Village Hotel. The landing site was located next to the hotel, right on the most famous, but also overpopulated, Waikiki Beach.

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Waikiki Beach

The Hilton "Lagoon" hotel was also close to the Helicopter landing pad and many of the local guests were joined by the approximately 1,000 fans that were waiting outside the fenced airfield. Ready to pay their tribute to the artist, who made three of his films in Hawaii ("Blue Hawaii, Girls! Girls! Girls! and Paradise Hawaiian Style!"), did a charity concert in 1961 (see Elvis in Hawaii 1961 - USS Arizona Memorial benefit) and now was going again to give a concert and its entire proceeds also benefited to a charity organization.

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Col. Parker opened the door to Elvis' side and when he got out, he was already expected by a group of dancing hula girls. With Red and Sonny West, Lamar Fike and the Colonel in tow, Elvis approached the waiting fans at the fence, where a female fan hung am white and red lei around his neck.

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Tom Moffat, the local radio DJ, was also present. Elvis and he met on earlier occasion (Hawaii 1957 + 1961). Moffat was also at the filming of "Blue Hawaii" there when he and Ron Jacobs appeared at the behest of Col. Parker in Snowman costumes.
He interviewed Elvis among other things on the set of "Girls! Girls" Girls "and made during Elvis' filming of" Paradise, Hawaiian Style "the interview with Peter Noone of the group "Herman Hermits". Moffat was trying to get for his live report a statement of Elvis, but Col. Parker monitored over that it took no longer than only a minute.

Live report:
"Elvis is now stepping out of the helicopter... he's attired in ... ah... a white suit.... ah... here
he comes… he's coming up to get leis from the crowd.

Tom: Hey Elvis! How are you?
Elvis: I'm alright.
Tom: Welcome back.
Elvis: Thank you.
Tom: Nice to see you.... what do you think?
Elvis: yeah... very very nice ....yeah... yeah.
Tom: How long are you going to be in town this time?
Elvis: well, about a week I could imagine, Tom.
Tom: You got a big show... in Sunday morning.
Elvis. It's got to be.... ah... I hope it's good, you know.
Tom: I'm sure it will be.
Elvis: I'm gonna do my best.
Tom: Elvis, we got a lot of people here want to give you leis and say "Hello" to you.
Elvis: OK....
Tom: It's the biggest launch since the last one. (USS Arizona Memorial benefit)
Elvis: It's the biggest ... think I've ever done.
Tom: yeah... yeah...
Elvis: I... ah... I appreciate it. Thank you.

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Elvis nodded to Tom Moffat, so to speak, a "goodbye", before he turned to the waiting fans. When Elvis went on, Moffat continue on the current events for the audience of his later broadcast.

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Moffat: "And that was Elvis Presley as he arrived here.... before 100s and 100s of people, who are now crowded around him giving him leis... ah... it’s really wild. Well, that's it. Elvis has arrived....your hear it first on KPOI.

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Sonny West recalls: "When we landed at the airport, so many leis were placed around Elvis' neck that you could hardly see his face. It was a thrill just to be a part of it. He loved it, of course, but he was also a little tense. He would be performing live before an estimated billion people around the world and he wanted everything just right.

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Article of Elvis' arrival in "The Honolulu Star Bulletin"

Elvis rented the entire top floor of the Hilton Hawaiian Village Hotel and the following nights rehearsal was held secretly in Hawaiian Dome, which were at the leisure and recreation park of the hotel grounds.
The musicians and singers, who arrived a few days before Elvis rehearsed for a week at the HIC (Honolulu International Center), in which also took place the show via satellite.
John Wilkinson:"One evening rehearsed the singers and the next day the musicians".

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Hilton Rainbow Tower

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H.I.C. Arena

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now namend Neal Blaisdell Center

to be continue....



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 Post subject: Re: Elvis in Hawaii 1973 - Aloha from Hawaii
PostPosted: Tue May 28, 2013 4:03 pm 
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On 10 January, a full-day rehearsal took place. A test run was scheduled for 12th January.
The final dress rehearsal was recorded as a "back up", in the event that something would go wrong during the live broadcast.
Although the transmission was planned down to the smallest detail and meticulously, there was in the days and hours before the satellite transmission some problems. The occurring technical problems threatened the entire transmission to fail. The technical equipment of Pasetta and his sound engineer Wally Heider needed more power than electricity in the building was available. Two hours before the show (start was at 20.30), the lights began to flicker, went off, and then back on, until the power finally completely failed.
They called the Navy for help and they came with blaring sirens to the HIC, to increase with their technical equipment the current capacity of the hall. The time was more than tight, but finally they managed to restore the supply of power - minutes before Elvis came on stage.

But the rehearsal revealed another problem: the concert was about 10 minutes shorter than calculated and Pasetta asked Elvis to extend his appearance to other songs. Elvis nodded and ordered Charlie Hodge to hand over the notes for 3 more songs to the orchestra. The extension was not a big deal for Elvis because he frequently during a concert - as required - impulsively amended a song list.
So the songs "Johnny Be Good", "I Can’t Stop Loving You" and a medley, consisting of "Long Tall Sally" and "Whole Lotta Shakin 'Going On" was added to the song list for the show (12th January).
Charlie Hodge recalls: "I had put together the song list and Elvis has also approved it. A few minutes before the intro were, one of the guys from the TV team up to me and said that the director (Pasetta) would like to speak with me. So I went to him and saw him standing together with Elvis. Elvis said, "Charlie, I need 3 songs". I had the procedure already laid down - so it would all messed up. "My goodness," I said, "where will I put them?" and Elvis just said "where do you want to do".
"There we were, ready with a concert to roll over the whole world and now I should install another 3 pieces. And the boss gave me the agony of choice (in this case Charlie's version differs from that of Pasetta). Well, I examined the 3 songs, ran onto the stage, grabbed my guitar - and we played the intro. But - the guys in the band knew nothing about the changes, so I asked them to pay attention to me. Before Elvis started, I had to turn to James Burton and Joe Guercio to announce the songs. James played always the first notes before the band got in". But there were other problems.

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Col. Parkers "To Do"-list

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Time- and schedule for the Aloha Special 13. + 14.1.1973

The rehearsal shows a relaxed Elvis, which is cheered by a wild acting audience and offered a better show (how many fans believe) as the main event, the satellite transmission on 14 January. Elvis was slim, acted loose and went, what he did not often musically totally out of himself. Burton's guitar is like "on fire" and Ronnie Tutt worked his drums so stormy that it literally sounded like thunder. Elvis was bursting with health, but more importantly, he sang
incredibly well and the interplay between him and the fans conveys a deep, mutual feeling of togetherness. But even better is the interplay between him and the musicians who obviously had their fun – in particular at the beginning of the show.
Especially James Burton often had the opportunity to put up with his legendary and groovy guitar riffs - developed by himself.
An important evidence and against the bad one can argue (musically speaking), are a "smoking" Steamroller Blues with a totally different guitar solo by James Burton, which topped the TV coverage that far. "Suspicious Mind" - much like the young fan who his idol, namely the King - would not let go as he was the goal of his desires, and the operatic "What Now My Love," which recalls of one of Elvis' singing idols, Roy Orbison.
It seems that Elvis is satisfied in this rehearsal show with himself. There was something hurts and almost touching side lay in the way he sang some ballads, even though the show was anything but quiet, but was rather stormy.

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All pictures are of the rehearsal Show 12.th
Notice that Elvis' Hair is longer than on 14.1.

This show revealed another, larger problem - namely for designer Bill Belew. In just 24 hours (up to 14.1.) The cape had to be replaced by a new one. For the tailors a pure panache. Bill Belew he worked in Los Angeles, was contacted and it was ordered as a replacement a second (short) cape than, whereupon Bill Belew said desperately, "but we have used all rubies and require new from Europe". He was told that ready were two first-class tickets, one for him personally and one for the Cape.
Bill Belew recalls: "The night of the show (12.1.) I got a call from Joe Esposito, who said "You’re not gonna believe what happened". And the only thing that came to my mind was "Oh my God, he split the costume!" But it turns out he got a little wild during dress rehearsal and threw the short cape into the audience. (Belew memory failed)
But that was not all. Esposito informed Belew that - when Elvis tried on the long cape –he could hardly stand or walk and in the attempt to go on stage he felt backwards to the ground. Belew: "He told me Elvis was lying on the floor, roaring with laughter. And to compound matters even further, Elvis - generous to a fault - had given away his large, white bejeweled belt, which bore the eagle motif in miniature, to a friend, Marie Lord, wife of "Hawaii Five-O"-star, Jack Lord.

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Jack Lord and his wife Marie

Elvis saw the recording of the rehearsal and decided that he did not like his hairstyle and thought someone had to styled his hair - what Patti Parry made, the only female member of the MM, but was treated by Elvis more like a little sister.
Patti Parry recalls: "I did his hair for that, I wasn't there for the rehearsal and Elvis was very unhappy at that first haircut. It looked like hell. Elvis wanted his hair cut properly and it was Marty Lacker - who was in L.A - who called me and we flew in together. I cut his hair for the final show and Marty Pasetta, the producer, said to me that Elvis had never looked so great. While I cut his hair, Elvis said "Patty look, I've got really thin, I feel really good".

The 13th January 1973 was declared by the Mayor of Honolulu as "Elvis Presley Day".
In Japan, there was - in anticipation of the Satellite Show - the 8th January (Elvis' birthday) even declared an "Elvis Presley Week." To the real dress rehearsal and final sound check Elvis appeared in civilian clothes.
On 13.1. Elvis received an Award for his charitiy, presented by Matt Esposito, Manager of H.I.C.

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to be continue....



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 Post subject: Re: Elvis in Hawaii 1973 - Aloha from Hawaii
PostPosted: Wed May 29, 2013 3:30 pm 
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14th January 1973 - the day of the big event.

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concert ticket

At 0.30 am local time Glen D. Hardin with his piano and his orchestra with Joe Guericio initiate the intro with "Also Sprach Zarathustra" (the soundtrack theme of the movie "2001 - A Space Odyssey) and under the powerful Boom Boom Boom Boom of the kettledrums Elvis enter the stage of the HIC. But it was not just the 6,000 spectators in the hall, which trembled with excitement and tension felt down to the last nerve of her body.
Elvis - as always nervous before a concert - was extremely aware that he had to cope with a task in which each fault is detected and seen by an audience of millions around the world.

Ronnie Tutt's intensive processing of his 10-chunky drum set operation drove the voltage on the peak when Elvis appeared on stage, strutting back and forth and showed his costume to the audience. The enthusiasm knew no bounds as the intro merge into the flaming rhythm of "See See Rider" .
The King of Entertainment took his guitar (which he rarely played, and used more as accessories), seized with slightly trembling hands the microphone and ... "Oh, see see rider, Oh see what you have done ...." - the rest is history.

That night Elvis sang very well, as good as his singing groups, JD Sumner & The Stamps, Sweet Inspiration and Kathy Westmoreland, did. The band and the orchestra also played very well.
Elvis' performance looked amazing private, as if he would most of the time singing to himself, but then remembered where he is and then goes directly to the runway to shake hands of those who are sitting in the front rows of the stage.
Known for his dynamic stage performances, Elvis moved quite moderate in this concert. His legendary hip movement as well as his - in the 70s - typical karate insert were used selectively only in some pieces.
The show was focused on the vocal performance and portrayed the mature artist. Elvis more ballads-song oriented selection in this period of his career reflects his heart and soul, a characteristic that in most cases is clearly the impetus for sweeping and disturbing performances, such as in this event.
"You Gave Me A Mountain" - a song that Elvis with heart and feeling afforded -as well as the bluesy "I'm So Lonesome I Could Cry," "It's Over" - a beautifully executed cover of Jimmie Rodgers song that Elvis brought back from oblivion, the absolutely beautiful I'll Remember You," and certainly the song "An American Trilogy" is a song that combines the image of Southern pride and fervently Gospel, to which the native Southerner Elvis fits like a second skin.

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Elvis handwritten songlist ot the 14.1.73

But he also sang so great and well-known songs such as "What Now My Love," "My Way" and "Something" - a Beatles song - and "Welcome To My World", a song that Elvis has newly included in his song list.
But the dramatic climax of the show was undeniably the song "An American Trilogy", which combines the hymns of the American Civil War, "Dixie" and "The Battle Of The Republic", together with the African-American spiritual "All My Trials" in itself. Elvis sang this song as a man who is very well aware that he is a product of this history, which is included in the song. This was reinforced by Elvis' patriotic American Eagle jumpsuit.
The breathtaking high note, sung by Elvis at the end sparked thunderous applause from the audience and chasing one a shiver down the spine.
Though the focus of the show was modern ballads, so neglected "The King" but not his former rock 'n' roll hits. He sang an excellent version of "Johnny Be Good" - the signature song of lead guitarist James Burton, which presented one of his funky solos again - a bold "A Big Hunk Of Love," "Suspicious Mind", the lascivious "Fever" and the absolutely fabulous "Steamroller Blues" by James Taylor.
"I’m a steamroller, baby...'m 'bout to roll all over you….'m a napalm-bomb, guaranteed to blow your mind…. I'm a cement mixer, a churning urn of burning funk!“

Who else but Elvis had such a mix of singers whose background Southern Gospel was, and the soul of the late 60's with the sweets, brought together? J.D. Sumner and The Stamps, The Sweet Inspiration and Kathy Westmoreland harmonized perfectly. The Joe Guericio orchestra and the band rounded off Elvis' concept of the show and were the icing on the cake, so to speak, an accompanying ensemble "fit for a King".

Elvis was a big fan of Jack Lord. A few days before the concert Col. Parker personally come to the condominium where the Lords live and brought an invitation for the show to the Lords. On the following day called Joe Esposito the Lords to reiterate how much it would Elvis signifying if they would accept the invitation and come to the show - which they did.
Jack Lord: “Ordinarily, Marie and I live like monks during the time I’m shooting. Both of us are up by five in the morning, so we never go out late during the week. But the invitation was so gracious that Marie and I just couldn’t turn it down”.
The Lords sat in the specific area that was reserved for Elvis' guests and for the places he had paid for it. After the presentation of all the members of his band and singers, Elvis expressed his admiration for the star of the series “Hawaii 5-0” that he pointed him out to the thousands of spectators and presented him by the words “One of my favorite actors is in the audience, I gotta say that - Hawaii 5-0 man, Jack Lord "- to the audience. Although the Lords were very well-known personalities, they were speechless and floored by the presentation because it was almost a tribute from one artist to another. So Jack stood up and taken his bows, live for all the world – except the US to see.

After the show, the Lords went backstage in Elvis' dressing room, and met there with Elvis.
Jack Lord: “The moment we met and shook hands it was as if we had known each other all our lives”. “The show okay?” asked Elvis and Jack smiled and said “you didn’t see me standing up on my chair and whistling?” Elvis laughed “the spotlights pretty well blind me, after I’m out there so long”.
“You know, a whistle can be the highest compliment” said Jack Lord. “It’s a tradition of the theater world,
A high compliment between one actor and another. At that moment, I wanted every person in this auditorium to stand up and cheer. I don’t mean that as a flattery. It means I suddenly got a gut feeling of the kind you were going through on stage. I have never heard such dramatic music in my life. Not anywhere, not from anyone”.

Elvis told the Lords that he’d love to see them before he left Hawaii and asked if they could have dinner together before his departure from Hawaii. Marie Lord smiled and said “Well, I’m sure you don’t go out to restaurants” and Elvis smiled back and said “well, no, but I could come to your house”.

But he paid tribute to Jack Lord not only, but also thanked Marty for his artwork consists Pasetta. “I’d like to thank our producer and director, ladies and gentlemen, Mr. Marty Pasetta for putting this show together. He’s really done a fantastic job, him and his staff. There’s been a lot of people workin’ on the show”.
But his thanks were also the audience for donations in the Kui Lee Cancer Fund. “As you know, we’re going out live via Satellite and we’re doing it for the Kui Lee Cancer Drive. We were supposed to raise five thousand dollars… eh…twenty-five thousand dollars and we raised seventy-five thousand dollars tonight – of you! So thank you, thank you very much”.

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Elvis, Marty Pasetta and Co-Producer Harry Waterson backstage

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Kui Lees widow Nani, her 5 kids and Eddie Shermann also attended the show

During the evening Elvis threw his jeweled belt into the audience. And before he headed on his closing vamp, the last song, he turned one last time to his audience. “Thank you very much, ladies and gentlemen. You’re really a fantastic audience, and there’s a song we did in “Blue Hawaii”, we did here about 10 years ago, and I’d like to sing it especially for you – “Can’t Help Falling In Love With You”. While he sang the song, Charlie Hodge put on his cape around him which signaled the end of his show for the band and the audience. Usually, he went to one knee, took the end of the cape in both hands and spread it in a grandiose gesture off as if he would embrace the audience symbolic, befitting for the world's biggest entertainers.

But for the conclusion of the show, on that evening he had a "special" for the audience. His belt had been thrown into the audience at the end of the song "American Trilogy" and now there was also the cape that he threw into the frenzied crowd, and as a result Elvis triggered in a mass hysteria among girls and women who sat in the front row. But ultimately was the lucky catcher Bruce Springs - a reporter for the Honolulu Advertiser.
Charlie Hodge recalls: Shortly before the show, Elvis came to me and said, "Tell no one, but if you're at the end of the show put on my Cape just put it into the loops - I'll throw it into the crowd."
This action came as a surprise for everyone - both for the band and for the audience - just as it was planned.

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Bruce Springs with the cape - article on Honolulu Advertiser

The Show:
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to be continue...



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 Post subject: Re: Elvis in Hawaii 1973 - Aloha from Hawaii
PostPosted: Wed May 29, 2013 3:33 pm 
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The Show:

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to be continue...



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 Post subject: Re: Elvis in Hawaii 1973 - Aloha from Hawaii
PostPosted: Wed May 29, 2013 3:58 pm 
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After this memorable evening was over, Elvis and the band and all the TV crew came back into the now empty hall to recording five more songs which were needed for the extended version of the Aloha Special – that on 4 April 1973 was broadcast in the United States. But ultimately only 4 songs for the American version of the Aloha Special were selected. This Session was recorded with two cameras. Each of the songs was inserted with an assembly of Hawaiian scenery. The cameras were - with Elvis on one side or in the corner with lots of black background, positioned.
Thus, the landscape images could be added later. A tricky thing at the then technical status of video production in 1973.

The following songs were rehearsed and recorded:
Blue Hawaii
Ku-u-i-po
No More
Hawaiian Wedding Song
Early Morning Rain.
Since Elvis' belt was missing, he was taken mostly from the waist up on from.

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Charlie Hodge: “When we were finished, I went to my room to relax. Suddenly the phone rang. Elvis was on the line. He asked, "Charlie, where are all the others?" and I said "I think the move to celebrate."
Elvis asked "what are you doing?" and I replied "I'm sitting here, watching the sea and slowly realize what we have done, we played in front of the whole world." "Charlie?" - "Yes?" - "Is not it amazing what did two Southern boys?". He did not say "look what I've done" - no, he actually said "what we've done." And despite our years of friendship, this was one of the most personal moments for me. When he said that, I felt so close to him as never before".

It is said that Elvis was so tired and exhausted that he slept straight through 24 hours.

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Elvis and M. Pasetta

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Elvis after the Show

A day after the concert, on 15 January, was released a ad at the Honolulu Advertiser, which expressed the thanks of Elvis and the Colonel.

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On the same day (15.1.) appeared in the Honolulu Advertiser the following Article by Wayne Harada about the live concert with the headline:
Gold Crown Awarded to “King” Elvis!
Elvis Presley received a golden crown – and a standing ovation – at the conclusion of his unprecedented satellite live TV concert beamed to a global audience of over 1,5 billion in the wee hours of the morning yesterday. A perspiring Presley simply held the crown, as he accepted the accolades – thus “The King” vanished backstage, another night’s work completed, The HIC Arena, dammed with 6000 Hawaii fans, became a supersized TV studio for the hour-long spectacle “Aloha from Hawaii”, which was televised to nearly 40 nations. It was a thrilling compact hour – long on music, loud of screams. Presley performed a total of 25 songs, included a rare and poignant rendition of Kui Lee’s “I’ll Remember You”. Like Friday night’s dress rehearsal, yesterday’s performance was a benefit to the Kui Lee Cancer Fund.

But unlike any other charitable production here, this one had that aura of The Big Time: a superstar doing a super performance, right before the eyes of the world. Camera crew was everywhere: on stage, in the aisles, in the audience, zooming in on Presley and his breakthrough performance, coordinated by RCA Record Tours.

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“Aloha from Hawaii” is the first entertainment special telecast live to a global audience; it will be expanded into a 90-minute NBC-TV special, for viewing here and on the Mainland later this year. Perhaps only a phenomenon like Elvis Presley could pull off such a coup, at such a wicked show going time – 12.30AM curtain, Hawaii time – yet draw a full house. The concert was similar in format to his pair of November shows at the HIC (see Elvis in Hawaii 1972): it began in darkness, with the “2001: A space Odyssey” fanfare preceding Presley’s entrance; it ended with Presley singing “Can’t Help Falling In Love With You”. Of course, there were differences. For starters, Presley hurled his flowing white studded cape – a trademark for his final number. That was a souvenir collector’s dream come true.
Too, the usual assortment of scarves went sailing into the audience at certain points of the show. The special erected set, on an unusually large stage with a protruding platform , consisted of basic black scrim that was as long as it was high, reaching to the ceiling of the arena. A series of mirrors framed both sides of the stage, and special lights – silhouetting the Presley form, spell out his name not only in English but in foreign tongues, flashed on and off occasionally. Once Presley emerged, he never was off stage. Once the show was under way, it didn’t stop for commercial breaks.
For the Hawaii audience his “I’ll Remember You” vocal easily was the most sentimental. The Presley version retained the Hawaiian flavor, but also capitalized on the International scope of the tune; it easily could emerge as Presley’s next No.1 hit. His “American Trilogy” medley – fusing “Dixie”, “Battle Hymn of Republic” and “All My Trials” – was another emotional instance, sending several hundred fans to their feet. But apparently the necessity to move on the show – when such TV airing time is so precious – forced Presley to cut short the audience response.

The concert was smartly paced and packaged to suit all camps in the Presley following. There were the old hits – “Love Me, Blue Suede Shoes, Hound Dog, Johnny B. Good, Long Tall Sally”. There were the recent clicks “Suspicious Mind, Something, Fever” – the latter with the classic Presley shuffles, from the hips downwards. And there were the special Presley renderings – of “Welcome To My World, It’s Over, I’m So Lonesome I Could Cry”. Only one did he pluck his guitar. After all, he had all the musical backing he needed: a six piece combo that travels with him, J.D. Sumner and The Stamps plus The Sweet Inspirations doing the background vocals, and a gigantic orchestra of about 40 pieces, including a splendidly nimble string section consisting of some of our symphony musicians. Presley kept his talk to a minimum. He quipped about “Hound Dog”: I was just a baby when I did that song. With sideburns. I’m lying like a roark”. He introduced Jack Lord as one of his actor favorites. A he reported that his original goal of $25,000 for the Kui Lee Cancer Fund had been exceeded, with more than $75,000 raised prior to show time.
Presley’s Aloha from Hawaii has been demonstrated before, when he helped raise funds for the building of the USS Arizona Memorial a decade ago. Yesterday’s show reaffirms Presley’s and manager Col. Tom Parker’s philanthropic fondness for Hawaii. Like the enduring nature of Kui Lee’s music, the incandescence of Presley is incomparable. Perhaps Presley had a hidden meaning regarding the late Kui Lee, when he sang the composer’s closing lines in “I’ll Remember You” as follows:”..... love me always, promise always, you’ll remember, too”.

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Kui Lee

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After the concert, during his Las Vegas engagement, on the 17th February 1973 Elvis was honored with an award from the American Cancer Society for its commitment to the Kui Lee Cancer Fund.

to be continue...



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 Post subject: Re: Elvis in Hawaii 1973 - Aloha from Hawaii
PostPosted: Wed May 29, 2013 4:44 pm 
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Some more facts about Aloha from Hawaii

The idea for the show had Col. Tom Parker, who was inspired by the transmission of Nixon's speech at the Great Wall of China via satellite from it.
Loanne Parker: “ It was history, it started when the Colonel was drivin from Palm Springs to Los Angeles, and I believe George Parkhill was driving. But he was at home with Marie, he would go every weekend. They were driving back to L.A. and on the radio they were talking about Richard Nixon doing a satellite broadcast from the Great Wall of China. This was the first satellite broadcast, the Colonel said that’s history! Elvis is a worldwide star, he should be the first entertainer to do a world-wide satellite show. That’s where the idea was born”.

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Aloha-Conttract

Often it’s reported that Jack Lord and Elvis meet for the first time after his Aloha from Hawaii.concert, what is not true.
Elvis became friends with Jack Lord as he vacationing in Hawaii in May 1972 and Lord presented him with a belt, the so-called "Jack Lord Belt" which Elvis wore with his "Thunderbird" Suit in his concerts on November 17, 1972.

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Thunderbird Suit with Jack Lord Belt

The American Eagle Suit cost at the time about $ 65,000 and would cost four times more of that at the present time. Of all the jumpsuits American Eagle was the worst: 75lbs

Fact is: There have been two, almost identical suits. Both were worn by Elvis during the shows
In January 1973, Elvis arrived on Hawaii for his upcoming television special “Aloha from Hawaii via Satellite”. Elvis was welcomed by long time friend and fellow actor Jack Lord who gave him a belt during the summer of the previous year. Elvis hadn’t forgotten this and promptly gave Jack a belt and cape in return. Not just a belt and cape but his new custom-made jumpsuit for his upcoming special; the “Aloha or AlohaBald Headed Eagle”. The people surrounding Elvis were gasping for air and Joe Esposito immediately phoned to the main land to obtain a new cape and belt. Around the clock working paid off and just before the rehearsal show, both items were replaced.

There were also made 3 belts. The second belt was identical to the first belt that Elvis never wore on stage, because he gave it to Jack Lord and his wife. The third belt has some minor differences and was always worn by Elvis when - after this event - he put on the Aloha Eagle Suit (73 in Vegas and later on tour in 1974).

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Rehearsal Show 12.1.73 with second belt

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27. June, Cincinnati/OH - wearing the 3. belt

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2. Belt - identic with the original

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3. Belt

the two belts - notice the difference!

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Bill for 2 Jumpsuits

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bill for the second cape

In 1973, "Aloha from Hawaii" was the most expensive production and cost about 2.5 million dollars.

Colonel Parker Elvis promised that they would go on a world tour to this historic show. The Aloha Show was supposedly made for this reason - to show Elvis to the world before he would go on the world tour. But unfortunately (for Elvis and us fans) the tour never materialized.

Another moot point (by fans and Elvis-“Experts” is the number of viewers of the Aloha Special.

In the interview of 5 9.1972 is seen behind Elvis the straw hats with all the names of the countries in which the show is transferred or to be seen.

1.row: Japan, Danmark, Italy, Mexico, Israel
2. row: USTV, Sweden, England, Norway, Brazil
3. row: France, Finland, Argentina, Australia and (head v. Laginestra covers a
land
4. row: South Vietnam, Korea, Spain (shoulder v. Laginestra covers a land)
5. row: New Zealand, Switzerland, Iran, Guam And. .. (v. Laginestra arm covers
a land).
Belgium, Indonesia, and Singapore ??


Other countries, which, though not live, but could see the show at a later date, are:
Germany, England, USA, Australia, Canada, Holland.
Parts of Communist China could also see the show as it was broadcast in Hong Kong. Therefore, there is the possibility that at least could receive the show in Macau and close to the border cities in China. The same goes for other communist countries around Germany and also Finland - in the border areas of the former USSR.

Other sources say "Aloha from Hawaii" was broadcast in the following countries: Japan, South Korea, Hong Kong, Philippines, South Vietnam, Thailand, Australia, New Zealand, Canada, Mexico, United States and 28 other countries in Europe. In total, there were 38 countries and Hong Kong, the British Protectorate.
An article in the Honolulu Advertiser reported that Rocco Laginestra mentioned 34 nations.
As you can see, the word is interpreted differently "world".

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Sent the show:

Japan and Hawaii - saw the concert live
Denmark - 20 January 73 (was the first European country to broadcast the
show)

Sweden - 20 January 73, 21:00 pm
Belgium - 21 January 73, at 20.45 pm and 1 x 1 x at 22.10 pm (58-minute
version)
France - 25 January 73
Switzerland - 8 March 73
Germany - 12 March 73 (60-minute version)
USA - 4. April., 73 - (90-minute version)
Canada - 4 April 73 (90-minute version)
Holland - 27 April 73
Australia - ? April and ? June 73
England 5 March 1978 - the first Time

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Weekly news article after the airing in the U.S.

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The audience of the show are (population of the country):

37,8% Japan live
81,8% Philippines live
70% Hongkong live
??? Hawaii live
51% USA

For Canada and European countries there is no clear specification of the audience numbers. Imagine a published index of about 1 1/2 billion viewers is quite. Whether it is realistic or conceivable, however - who knows.
This report and therefore the "Elvis in Hawaii" concert series I close with an article of Billboard magazine from1973, which is little to add.

"Although he is perhaps one of the world’s greatest music legends, Presley proceeds to stay an audience with more guts and more soul and more intensity vocally than any performer alive. His shows are not only a production, but a musical “happening”. And this live recording (Aloha from Hawaii), which offers eight tunes previously unrecorded by Elvis, is not only a historical event because of the satellite broadcost and the US-TV special of the Hawaiian performance, but because Elvis, a focus point in the orgin of rock, is perhaps back, cooking again like he seldom has in the past several years".

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Enjoy :hello:



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