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 Post subject: Elvis' dream.
PostPosted: Fri Oct 13, 2006 8:36 am 
Jewel in the Lotus
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I would like to bring in, a valid approach to Elvis' heart dreams. Again we have Elvis as a good reference for the rest of us, about holding onto our heart's dream:


The interpretation of dreams by Paul Simpson Aug 4, 2006
Source: Elvis Australia


"One day things will be different" - Elvis Presley, as a boy, while strumming his guitar on the back porch, overheard by his father.

We know a lot about Elvis Presley. But the most significant of the many things we don't know about him is how, when and why he came to believe that, as he vowed to himself when he was a skinny, poor, boy in the poorest state of the union, one day things would be different.

For an intellectual bigot like Albert Goldman, Elvis' success is a fluke. For Peter Guralnick, it was testament to his extraordinary hope, optimism and openness to the vibrant, varied cultures – musical, social and racial – that surrounded him.

One thing's for sure, Elvis meant to be famous. Millions of children dream of transforming their – and their parents' lives – with a clichéd rags to riches story. But his dream came true. And no matter how you explain that, it’s clear that Elvis did his utmost to realise his dreams in ways that contradict the lazy stereotype of him as a shy, stupid, country boy tied to – or almost strangled by – his momma's apron strings.

He was, as Sam Phillips noted, "more afraid of being hurt than anyone I ever met". But he confronted that fear in remarkable ways. When he was eight, he hitched rides to the WELO radio station to see his idol Mississippi Slim and, through sheer childish persistence, played on the show. When he was ten, he sang Old Shep at the Mississippi-Alabama Fair, insisting "I'd set my heart on singing and nothing in the world could have stopped me."

In Memphis, the orthodox version of his discovery makes him sound like a passive accomplice. But even before strolling into Sun Studios in the summer of 1953, he performed (Johnny Burnette says) at the local fire station, may have played with Burnette’s group, often sat in his truck pondering Sun Studios and behaved, not like the idiot savant of myth, but like a talented, ambitious, young man calculating how best to ensure his gifts were discovered.

He famously said in a speech in 1971 that every dream he ever dreamed came true a hundred times. But that fulfilment was marred by tragedy – the untimely death of Gladys, the end of his marriage and the emotional and physical cost, to himself, of living up to a title – The King – he regarded as sacrilegious.

But if Elvis Presley had never dreamed, we might never have heard of him. That, for me, is what makes his performance of If I Can Dream in the 1968 comeback special so revelatory. That song – right down to its vaguely expressed, yet sincere, yearnings for a better world – is his manifesto. Watching him rehearsing the song on DVD makes the final performance even more moving. He waits, obediently in his white suit, sounding as respectful as a very well-trained waiter. And then the song takes hold of him.

In those takes, we witness the transformation that electrified friends, acquaintances and musicians – the shift from Elvis the person to Elvis the star, a legendary figure of myth, mystery and magnitude. At the end, he spreads his arms out, in a pose vaguely reminiscent of the crucifixion and mumbles an unsure, apologetic, "thank you and goodnight".

Although he later often sang My Way, Paul Anka's song never feels, to me, as if Elvis believes it. He'll sing it as well as he can but the song's strange mix of fake humility and self-dramatising bombast isn't him. He bares his soul in If I Can Dream – it is his mini-autobiography. Nothing in My Way matches the inspiring grandeur of the line: "As long as a man has the strength to dream, he can redeem his soul". Listen to the passion and belief with which he nails that line and it's hard to believe he ever sang fluff like A Dog’s Life.

Director Sidney Lumet once said that, watching Elvis, he felt in the presence of a restless spirit, doomed never to feel at home, tragically unaware of his own separation from the rest of the human race. Lumet was haunted by that impression – echoed by Priscilla who suggested that, like his dad, Elvis was prone to terrible bouts of loneliness when he seemed utterly adrift from humanity. Maybe he was unaware of that separation or maybe he dreamt that, once things were different, it might disappear. Either way, his dreams changed our lives and his. And If I Can Dream gets closer than anything to revealing how a poor country boy apparently destined for anonymous oblivion became Elvis Presley. That's why, for me, it is the one indispensable Elvis song.



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Amanda Viola

Elvis said: "LOVE is what it's all about." :*::*: Now I know it's true.
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PostPosted: Sat Oct 14, 2006 9:05 am 
Jewel in the Lotus
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You are welcome, Sue!

But now that I see it again, I guess I could have edited it some or rather put the link.

I think that I could not resist the temptation to use it as a reminder of the GREAT IMPORTANCE OF HOLDING ONTO OUR HEART'S DREAM AND NEVER LET IT GO. :roll: :P



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Amanda Viola

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PostPosted: Sat Oct 14, 2006 9:03 pm 
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Quote:
Director Sidney Lumet once said that, watching Elvis, he felt in the presence of a restless spirit, doomed never to feel at home, tragically unaware of his own separation from the rest of the human race. Lumet was haunted by that impression – echoed by Priscilla who suggested that, like his dad, Elvis was prone to terrible bouts of loneliness when he seemed utterly adrift from humanity. Maybe he was unaware of that separation or maybe he dreamt that, once things were different, it might disappear. Either way, his dreams changed our lives and his.


SO ESPECIALLY TRUE TO ME! Yet there was a reason why he felt that separation and I believe it was because he was not living his truth. I don't mean that he was insincere on dishonest, but that he felt UNWORTHY to live his truth. Had he done so, he would have effected for good this planet 10 fold MORE than he did!! And he would not have had to suffer and die so young to do it.

It is not easy to live one's truth under the conditions Elvis faced, so I am not wagging my finger at his "ghost." Who really DOES live their truth...surrendering ALL to it..NOT ME, I'M SORRY TO SAY! But Elvis was at the focal point of intense global energy...a current of mass humanity ran right through his meridians! So Elvis "not living his truth" had far more powerful results than a person in a lesser global energy position.

JUST MY PERSONAL INSIGHTS.



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Maia Nartoomid, author of Blue Star Love (Elvis Book)
http://elvisbluestarlove.wordpress.com
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PostPosted: Sat Oct 14, 2006 11:26 pm 
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Good one Maia. I agree that Elvis was "adrift" and not one with his existence on earth. He felt so lonely at times I could feel that he was almost panicky at being "alone"...yet there were people at his house-he was just locked up in his room "alone"...and at his own hand. It was like he couldn't stand to be with his friends or anyone at those times-that he just had to deal with it himself. That he was a twin probably made it more acute also...he came with another, but he entered life alone...and was always alone in his own mind. No one understood him-no one could get into that close space that he alone occupied-he wouldn't let them...and admited that he was afraid to do so again...it hurt too much. Maybe he just didn't let anyone, even those he loved and who loved him really get inside that space he kept for himself ? ?? Maybe he couldn't take the chance-it hurt too much to lose that closeness he once felt with sharing space with his brother? Only he knows. wjh



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PostPosted: Sun Oct 15, 2006 4:13 am 
Jewel in the Lotus
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Quote:
Yet there was a reason why he felt that separation and I believe it was because he was not living his truth. I don't mean that he was insincere on dishonest, but that he felt UNWORTHY to live his truth.


Maia,

What you say resonates very much in me. (What I repeat very often to others -and to myself- is "Dare to be YOU!") It is very difficult to get to the point where one feels worthy to do that. Christian religion set the concept of "guilt" along its history. Jesus never did. I think that to dare to be oneself is felt as arrogance, egoism and something to be blamed for.

What I believe is that, not acting oneself, one lessens God's design, to say it short. We are not projecting or expressing our full potentiality, so it's denyed to the world.


Wanda,

I agree with you about the great influence that losing his twin brother had in Elvis' life. Besides all you say, that I think accurate from my point of view, the sense of "guilt" was added to it. It helped the feeling of being "unworthy".



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Amanda Viola

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PostPosted: Sun Oct 15, 2006 8:57 am 
Jewel in the Lotus
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even in times I knew less about him, there was one thing always kept my mind busy..he was too much with all he had done already,but thinking about the real peak he could have reached with his potential he had in him, is something overwhelming even to imagine..now I can understand why it doubles the pain,having him on earth for such a short time and losing him so early..it makes me feel what a great loss was this for humanity or what would have happened if he could have freed his full powers and completed the rest of his purpose in life..as I said before..beyond my imagination..



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PostPosted: Sun Oct 15, 2006 10:37 am 
Jewel in the Lotus
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I understand that feeling of yours, Zey.

What comes quickly to me, is the idea that all of us are FREE to work in the direction of BEING OURSELVES to full extent, at least as much as posible. Nothing but ourselves, can stop us from doing it!

Elvis is a wonderful reference of many aspects refered to ourselves. This is one more and not of a lesser importance.



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Amanda Viola

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